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Toxicology

Cantharidin Toxicosis from Blister Beetles in Horses
March/April 2017, Equine Medicine , Toxicology

Cantharidin Toxicosis from Blister Beetles in Horses

MaryEllen Malysiak BS, CVT | ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center | Urbana, Illinois

MaryEllen earned her bachelor’s degree in science at the University of Illinois in Animal Sciences. She then went back to school at Parkland College and became a certified veterinary technician. She has been an active member of the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center since May of 2011. Outside of work, MaryEllen enjoys spending time with her off-the-track thoroughbred horse, Parker, and volunteering with her Pet Partners–registered dog, Ruby.

Blister beetles, also known as Spanish fly, contain a toxic substance called cantharidin that can severely injure or kill horses. Learn the signs of cantharidin toxicosis and preventive measures for owners.

Xylitol: A Sweetener That Is Not So Sweet
Jan/Feb 2017, Toxicology

Xylitol: A Sweetener That Is Not So Sweet

Carrie Lohmeyer-Mauzy CVT, BS, ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, Urbana, Illinois

Carrie has been working as a certified veterinary technician at the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (APCC) since 2007. She obtained her associate’s degree in veterinary technology from Parkland College in 2003 and her bachelor’s degree in natural resources and environmental science from the University of Illinois in 2006. She worked for 2.5 years at a small animal clinic while in college and has assisted with several research projects in fish and wildlife ecology.

During her 10 years at the APCC, Carrie has gained a wealth of knowledge in the field of toxicology. She has been published in several peer-reviewed journals and is currently studying to become a board-certified toxicologist.

Since 2002, the annual number of cases of xylitol toxicosis reported to the ASPCA APCC has risen into the thousands. This article gives an overview of the signs, clinical effects, and management of this increasingly common toxicosis.

Oral Decontamination in Dogs and Cats
Nov/Dec 2016, Toxicology

Oral Decontamination in Dogs and Cats

Erin Freed CVT, BAS | ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center

Erin has been employed with the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (APCC) since 2006. She earned her associate’s degree in applied science in veterinary technology from Parkland Community College and her bachelor’s degree in applied science in veterinary hospital management from St. Petersburg College in 2016. Erin’s interests include toxicology, but her true passion is sharing knowledge and educating veterinary staff. She has been an instructor for a toxicology continuing education (CE) course for the Veterinary Support Personnel Network and has spoken at several APCC CE conferences. Erin has had peer-reviewed articles published in Veterinary Technician, the NAVTA Journal, and Veterinary Medicine and has authored a chapter on the renal system in Small Animal Toxicology Essentials.

Decontamination to minimize or prevent clinical signs of toxicosis is an important step in managing poisoning cases. Read this article to learn about common methods of oral decontamination.

Toxicology Talk is written and reviewed by members of the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) Animal Poison Control Center (APCC). The mission of the APCC is to help animals exposed to potentially hazardous substances, which it does by providing 24-hour veterinary and diagnostic treatment recommendations from specially trained veterinary toxicologists. It also protects and improves animal lives by providing clinical toxicology training to veterinary toxicology residents, consulting services, and case data review.
Sep/Oct 2016, Toxicology

Top 10 Toxins That Are Rarely Serious

Jennifer A. Schuett CVT | ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, Urbana, Illinois

Jennifer worked in a small animal practice for 6 years before considering toxicology. She went to Joliet Junior College for her associate’s degree in veterinary medical technology, graduated in May 2010, and became a certified veterinary technician by August 2010. She has been with the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center for a little over 5 years. Jennifer has written several protocols for her workplace and articles for an online veterinary magazine, as well as being an active board moderator on the Veterinary Support Personnel Network (VSPN).

In her spare time, Jennifer likes to garden, craft, and spend time with friends and family. When Halloween season comes around, she is also an actor/makeup artist for a local haunted house. Jennifer and her husband Tom celebrated their first wedding anniversary in June 2016.

Read this article for some very common “toxic” exposures that may sound serious but rarely cause any significant clinical signs. Some recommendations for treatment—if needed—are included.

EARLY CLINICAL SIGNS OF MUSHROOM INGESTION include vomiting, diarrhea, depression, tremors, and seizures. If the client is reporting mushroom ingestion, have them collect all the pieces of the mushroom in a bag labeled “DO NOT EAT! POISONOUS!” for identification purposes. Educate clients to scour their yards frequently and get rid of any mushrooms they find.
July/Aug 2016, Toxicology

How to Take a Toxin Exposure History

Jennifer A. Schuett CVT | ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, Urbana, Illinois

Jennifer worked in a small animal practice for 6 years before considering toxicology. She went to Joliet Junior College for her associate’s degree in veterinary medical technology, graduated in May 2010, and became a certified veterinary technician by August 2010. She has been with the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center for a little over 5 years. Jennifer has written several protocols for her workplace and articles for an online veterinary magazine, as well as being an active board moderator on the Veterinary Support Personnel Network (VSPN).

In her spare time, Jennifer likes to garden, craft, and spend time with friends and family. When Halloween season comes around, she is also an actor/makeup artist for a local haunted house. Jennifer and her husband Tom celebrated their first wedding anniversary in June 2016.

“My pet just ate this! What do I do?” Pets tend to eat anything and everything. Some exposures may be more of a concern than others. Getting the details of the exposure is very important.

Iron Toxicosis
May/June 2016, Toxicology

Iron Toxicosis

Erin Freed CVT, BAS | ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center

Erin has been employed with the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (APCC) since 2006. She earned her associate’s degree in applied science in veterinary technology from Parkland Community College and her bachelor’s degree in applied science in veterinary hospital management from St. Petersburg College in 2016. Erin’s interests include toxicology, but her true passion is sharing knowledge and educating veterinary staff. She has been an instructor for a toxicology continuing education (CE) course for the Veterinary Support Personnel Network and has spoken at several APCC CE conferences. Erin has had peer-reviewed articles published in Veterinary Technician, the NAVTA Journal, and Veterinary Medicine and has authored a chapter on the renal system in Small Animal Toxicology Essentials.

Many common household items contain elemental iron, which can be toxic if consumed in great enough quantities. Learn how to calculate ingested amounts and the steps of decontamination and treatment in affected animals.

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