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Internal Medicine

Fall 2019, Internal Medicine

A Foreign Body That Is “Sew” Unusual

Brittany Laflen RVT, VTS (Neurology)

Brittany provides clinical case work and teaches fundamentals of neurology and neurologic diseases to students in the veterinary nursing program at Purdue University. In 2010, she received her Associate of Science degree in Veterinary Technology from Purdue University, and in 2012, she began working in the Purdue neurology department as a Registered Veterinary Technician. She recently became a credentialed Veterinary Technician Specialist in Neurology.

Foreign bodies within the spinal cord are uncommon, but when they occur the prognosis is often grave. Find out what happened to Leon, an 18-month-old Maltese, when he accidentally ingested a sewing needle.

Summer 2018, Internal Medicine

2018 Veterinary Emerging Topics (VET)® Report

Rachel Beck CVT, PMP

Rachel Beck is a certified veterinary technician and credentialed project manager on the Veterinary Medical Programs team at Banfield Pet Hospital. She currently leads a team of project managers who specialize in implementation. Having been in the veterinary field for over 15 years, she has served roles both in hospitals and at Banfield’s central office. She is passionate about engaging the whole veterinary team in proactive health and wellness as well as about career pathing for paraprofessionals in the industry. She resides in Portland, Oregon, with her significant other and 2 cats.

From the Field shares insights from Banfield Pet Hospital veterinary team members. Drawing from the nationwide practice’s extensive research, as well as findings from its electronic veterinary medical records database and more than 8 million annual pet visits, this column is intended to explore topics and spark conversations relevant to veterinary practices that ultimately help …

Spring 2018, Internal Medicine

Hematemesis, Abdominal Pain and Anemia in an Older Cat

Kimberly Harper LVT, VCA Southern Maryland Veterinary Referral Center Waldorf, MD

Kimberly Harper, LVT received her AAS in veterinary technology from San Juan College in 2011. She began her career at VCA SouthPaws where she spent almost 6 years in the ICU. She is currently employed by Southern Maryland Veterinary Referral and Emergency Center in Waldorf, MD.

Abnormal fatigue, lack of appetite, faster-than-normal pulse, weight loss, pale gums, and loss of energy are common symptoms of feline anemia.

Spring 2018, Internal Medicine

Fluid Calculations: Keeping a Balance

Angela Thorp CVT, VTS (ECC, SAIM) 1st Pet Veterinary Centers, Chandler, Arizona

Angela has been in the veterinary field for over 25 years, obtaining her CVT and AAS in Veterinary Technology through DEVTP, and later obtaining her VTS in Emergency & Critical Care. She is a charter member of the Academy of Veterinary Internal Medicine Technicians (AIMVT), served as past president of the previous state technician association in Arizona and committee chair for the exam committee of AVECCT. Currently she serves as Executive Secretary of AVECCT and a Domain Chair of the AVECCT Nursing Standards Committee. Angela is also the NAVTA State Representative for Arizona. In 2001, she was awarded the Technician of the Year from the Arizona Veterinary Medical Association. She lectures, has been published, and currently serves the Team Director at 1st Pet Veterinary Centers.

IV fluid therapy is a skill veterinary technicians utilize daily.

How Often Does Treatment Follow the Guidelines?
May/June 2017, Internal Medicine

How Often Does Treatment Follow the Guidelines?

Rachel Beck CVT, PMP

Rachel Beck is a certified veterinary technician and credentialed project manager on the Veterinary Medical Programs team at Banfield Pet Hospital. She currently leads a team of project managers who specialize in implementation. Having been in the veterinary field for over 15 years, she has served roles both in hospitals and at Banfield’s central office. She is passionate about engaging the whole veterinary team in proactive health and wellness as well as about career pathing for paraprofessionals in the industry. She resides in Portland, Oregon, with her significant other and 2 cats.

Nathaniel Spofford MPH | Banfield Pet Hospital, Portland, Oregon

Nate Spofford is a Senior Research Specialist on Banfield’s Applied Research & Knowledge (BARK) team. He received his Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Puget Sound and his Master of Public Health degree from Portland State University. Before joining Banfield, Nate worked in clinical, behavioral, and public health research at Oregon Health & Science University. Nate is dedicated to conducting population-based research to support the practice of evidence-based medicine. He currently lives in Portland, Oregon, with his wife Kenzin, daughter Madeleine, and cat Smallie.

This new column explores the findings of the inaugural Banfield VET Report on antimicrobial usage in veterinary practice. This article gives an overview of how often antimicrobials are used as recommended for respiratory tract and urinary tract infections.

Body Cavity Centesis: Techniques for the Pleural, Abdominal, and Pericardial Cavities
March/April 2017, Internal Medicine

Body Cavity Centesis: Techniques for the Pleural, Abdominal, and Pericardial Cavities

H. Edward Durham, Jr CVT, LATG, VTS (Cardiology)

Ed is Lead Anesthesia Veterinary Technician at Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine. He has worked with cardiology patients for most of his veterinary technical career. As a charter member of the Academy of Internal Medicine for Veterinary Technicians and the academy’s Director at Large for Cardiology for 12 years, he led the effort to create specialization for veterinary technicians in veterinary cardiology. He was the first veterinary technician to receive certification as a Veterinary Technician Specialist in Cardiology. He is the author/editor of Cardiology for Veterinary Technicians and Nurses and more than a dozen peer-reviewed articles, as well as an international speaker and educator on the subject of veterinary cardiology.

Body cavity centesis is a valuable and effective treatment for removal of large effusions. Although veterinarians generally perform centesis, it is important for veterinary technicians to be knowledgeable about the techniques used to properly prepare, assist with, and monitor these patients.

Go With the Flow: The Basics of Fluid Therapy for Small Animal Veterinary Technicians
July/Aug 2016, Internal Medicine

The Basics of Fluid Therapy for Small Animal Veterinary Technicians

Liz Hughston MEd, RVT, CVT, VTS (SAIM, ECC)

Liz practices as a relief veterinary technician and consultant in the San Francisco Bay Area for both general and emergency/specialty practices. She graduated from Foothill College in 2006 and went on to earn her certification as a veterinary technician specialist in both small animal internal medicine and emergency and critical care in 2012. Liz is dedicated to advancing veterinary nursing through training and mentorship and is a frequent and sought-after national and international speaker. In 2013, Liz was awarded the California Registered Veterinary Technician’s Association’s inaugural RVT of the Year Award, recognizing her efforts to improve veterinary nursing in California and beyond.

Fluid therapy is one of the most common therapies in small animal medicine, and knowing what, why, and how to deliver it is a core competency for veterinary technicians. This article provides a brief overview of each aspect.

May/June 2016, Internal Medicine

Preventing Motion Sickness in Dogs

Amy Newfield CVT, VTS (ECC)

Amy is employed by BluePearl Veterinary Partners as a Training Project Manager. After working in general practice, she found her passion in emergency medicine and in 2003 became a Veterinary Technician Specialist in Emergency and Critical Care. She has held several board positions in the Academy of Veterinary Emergency & Critical Care Technicians & Nurses, including president. Amy has published numerous articles, is an international speaker, has received numerous awards (including 2 Speaker of the Year awards), and is highly involved in her community. She and her wonderful furry kids live in Massachusetts, where you can find her eating chocolate, running in the woods, competing her dogs in agility, and scuba diving in the ocean.

In animals, motion sickness may be a behavior issue rather than a physical one. This article describes the potential causes of motion sickness in dogs and available therapeutic options.

Purr-fect Feline Anesthesia
March/April 2016, Anesthesiology , Internal Medicine

Purr-fect Feline Anesthesia

Heidi Reuss-Lamky LVT, VTS (Anesthesia & Analgesia, Surgery), FFCP

Heidi Reuss-Lamky graduated from Michigan State University’s Veterinary Technology Program in 1984. She has extensive experience in general practice, and since 1993 has devoted her technical expertise to the surgical department of specialty hospitals. She has been affiliated with Oakland Veterinary Referral Services in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, since 2006.

Heidi became certified through the Academy of Veterinary Technicians in Anesthesia and Analgesia in 2003, and sat on the credentials committee from 2005 to 2009. She served in the president’s role on the Executive Board of the Michigan Association of Veterinary Technicians from 2007 to 2009. She was a charter member of the Academy of Veterinary Surgical Technicians and currently sits on the executive board. She has a special interest in veterinary behavior medicine and earned her Fear Free Certification in November 2017.

Heidi is an ardent advocate for the veterinary technology profession, and serves as a consultant for many allied veterinary industries. She is on the National Association of Veterinary Technicians in America Committee on Veterinary Technician Specialties, and also serves on the editorial review board for Today’s Veterinary Nurse Journal.

Heidi is a prolific author and lecturer, presenting anesthesia, surgical nursing, and Fear Free-related topics at veterinary meetings worldwide. She most recently published Chapter 8, “Waste Anesthetic Gas Collection and Consequences,” in Veterinary Anesthetic and Monitoring Equipment, edited by Kristen Cooley and Rebecca Johnson. She was also honored to receive the 2013 NAVC Dr. Jack L. Mara Memorial Lecturer award.

Heidi currently shares her home with her husband, Bryan, and 3 dogs, 2 cats, an African grey parrot and pond koi. In her spare time she enjoys horseback riding, gardening, travel, lecturing, and quenching her never-ending thirst for knowledge.

Anesthetizing cats can present several challenges, from managing patient stress to administering anesthetics to monitoring during the procedure. Read this article for information that can help you improve the anesthesia experience for your feline patients.

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