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Toxicology

Summer 2020, Toxicology

Chlorfenapyr Poisoning in Dogs: A “Phantom” Toxicosis

Camille Kelly CVT, VTS (ECC)

Camille is a veterinary ICU nurse at the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine. Camille graduated with a degree in equine science from Delaware Valley University, in Doylestown, Pa. After working in various private practices, she joined Oradell Animal Hospital in Oradell, N.J., where emergency and critical care became her focus. Her special interests include snakebite envenomation, feline critical care, and blood component therapy. She is passionate about mentoring veterinary nurses, training in advanced nursing skills, and supporting veterinary students in their professional development.

When Daisy presented with signs of toxicity after 2 of her animal companions died hours earlier, this veterinary team worked to determine the cause.

Featured, Spring 2019, Toxicology

Illicit Drugs: What Veterinary Nurses Need to Know

Erin Freed CVT, BAS | ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center

Erin has been employed with the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (APCC) since 2006. She earned her associate’s degree in applied science in veterinary technology from Parkland Community College and her bachelor’s degree in applied science in veterinary hospital management from St. Petersburg College in 2016. Erin’s interests include toxicology, but her true passion is sharing knowledge and educating veterinary staff. She has been an instructor for a toxicology continuing education (CE) course for the Veterinary Support Personnel Network and has spoken at several APCC CE conferences. Erin has had peer-reviewed articles published in Veterinary Technician, the NAVTA Journal, and Veterinary Medicine and has authored a chapter on the renal system in Small Animal Toxicology Essentials.

Marijuana, amphetamines, cocaine, heroin, and hallucinogenic mushrooms are five of the most common illicit drugs companion animals are exposed to. Here is everything you need to know about them.

Featured, Spring 2019, Toxicology

Guide to Managing Toxin Ingestion in Pet Patients

Courtney Waxman BAS, CVT, RVT, VTS (ECC)

Courtney has worked in emergency and specialty veterinary practice for almost 15 years. Her areas of special interest include CPR, mechanical ventilation, one-on-one case management, critical care nursing, critical thinking, and technician/nurse training. She currently works as an instructor for Purdue University’s Veterinary Nursing Distance Learning Program and in the veterinary teaching hospital’s intensive care unit. She lectures nationally and internationally on topics relating to emergency and critical care and has been published in several veterinary technician/nursing journals. In 2019, Courtney was awarded New Educator of the Year by the Association of Veterinary Technician Educators.

Companion animals are susceptible to several potentially life-threatening toxicants, ranging from human food and medication to animal medication, common plants, illicit drugs, routine household products, and more. Is your veterinary clinic prepared?

Fall 2018, Toxicology

Digging Into Compost Intoxication

Frank Davis BS, CVT ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, Urbana, IL

Laura Stern DVM, DABVT ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, Urbana, IL

Good veterinary nursing care and rapid identification of new or worsening clinical signs in companion animals are key to successfully managing compost intoxication cases.

Summer 2018, Toxicology

Lead Toxicity: A Threat to Wildlife

Sarah Kolb BAS, RVT, VTS (Exotic Companion Animals), ISU Lloyd Veterinary Medical Center, Ames, IA

Sarah earned a Bachelor of Applied Science in Veterinary Nursing from St. Petersburg College and the Veterinary Technician Specialty (Exotic Companion Animals). She currently works at ISU Lloyd Veterinary Medical Center in Ames, Iowa. She is a member of the National Association of Veterinary Technicians in America and International Association of Animal Behavior Consultants. Sarah has written numerous articles and lectured extensively on exotic animal topics. She has fostered birds for the Des Moines Animal Rescue League since 2014. Her interests include avian anatomy, physiology, behavior and enrichment; wildlife rehabilitation; and anesthesia.

An estimated 20 million animals, including more than 130 differing species throughout the food chain, die each year from lead poisoning, according to the Humane Society of the United States. The fundamental treatment for lead toxicity is chelation therapy.

Winter 2018, Toxicology

Winter Holiday Toxins for Pets

Carrie Lohmeyer-Mauzy CVT, BS, ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, Urbana, Illinois

Carrie has been working as a certified veterinary technician at the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (APCC) since 2007. She obtained her associate’s degree in veterinary technology from Parkland College in 2003 and her bachelor’s degree in natural resources and environmental science from the University of Illinois in 2006. She worked for 2.5 years at a small animal clinic while in college and has assisted with several research projects in fish and wildlife ecology.

During her 10 years at the APCC, Carrie has gained a wealth of knowledge in the field of toxicology. She has been published in several peer-reviewed journals and is currently studying to become a board-certified toxicologist.

The winter holiday season holds an abundance of dangers for domestic pets that could result in toxicosis. This article focuses on decontamination and treatment for exposures to chocolate, grapes and raisins, and homemade playdough in dogs, as well as plants that can be toxic to both dogs and cats.

Dermal, Ocular, and Inhalation Decontamination in Dogs and Cats
Sep/Oct 2017, Toxicology

Dermal, Ocular, and Inhalation Decontamination in Dogs and Cats

Erin Freed CVT, BAS | ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center

Erin has been employed with the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (APCC) since 2006. She earned her associate’s degree in applied science in veterinary technology from Parkland Community College and her bachelor’s degree in applied science in veterinary hospital management from St. Petersburg College in 2016. Erin’s interests include toxicology, but her true passion is sharing knowledge and educating veterinary staff. She has been an instructor for a toxicology continuing education (CE) course for the Veterinary Support Personnel Network and has spoken at several APCC CE conferences. Erin has had peer-reviewed articles published in Veterinary Technician, the NAVTA Journal, and Veterinary Medicine and has authored a chapter on the renal system in Small Animal Toxicology Essentials.

Erin Freed, CVT, BAS, offers her insight into effective methods of decontamination in dogs and cats.

July/Aug 2017, Toxicology

Interrupts: Toxicants Resulting in Rapid and Severe Clinical Toxicosis

Carrie Lohmeyer-Mauzy CVT, BS, ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, Urbana, Illinois

Carrie has been working as a certified veterinary technician at the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (APCC) since 2007. She obtained her associate’s degree in veterinary technology from Parkland College in 2003 and her bachelor’s degree in natural resources and environmental science from the University of Illinois in 2006. She worked for 2.5 years at a small animal clinic while in college and has assisted with several research projects in fish and wildlife ecology.

During her 10 years at the APCC, Carrie has gained a wealth of knowledge in the field of toxicology. She has been published in several peer-reviewed journals and is currently studying to become a board-certified toxicologist.

Some toxic agents—“interrupts”—require emergency care for even small exposures. Learn how to manage patients that have been exposed to one of these interrupt agents: 5-fluorouracil, zinc phosphide, or hops.

May/June 2017, Toxicology

Trazodone in Veterinary Medicine

Tamara Foss CVT | ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center | Urbana, Illinois

Tamara has been with the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center since 2000. She earned her bachelor’s degree in agriculture with an emphasis in animal health technology from Murray State University in Kentucky. Tamara especially enjoys the toxicology-, research-, and information technology–related aspects of her position at the ASPCA. She has a passion for greyhounds and is an active volunteer and foster for American Greyhound. Outside of work, she loves spending time with her greyhounds, especially helping her greyhound Callen have fun playing running games like lure coursing and straight racing.

Trazodone is commonly prescribed in human medicine to treat various disorders, such as depression and anxiety, and is sometimes used in pets as well. Here’s what to do if an animal is accidentally exposed to toxic amounts of trazodone.

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