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Clinical Pathology

Fall 2021, Clinical Pathology

The Veterinary Nurse’s Guide to Fecal Flotation Techniques

JoLynn Haller LVT, VTS - Clinical Practice (Canine/Feline)

JoLynn, a graduate of SUNY Delhi, has been in clinical practice for 16 years. She has experience in shelter medicine, emergency medicine, and is currently in small animal clinical practice. JoLynn serves on the board of the Academy of Veterinary Technicians in Clinical Practice as a Canine/Feline Member at Large to consult on canine and feline updates. She currently works at VCA Fairmount Animal Hospital in Syracuse, New York, as the Veterinary Technician Supervisor. Her current interests are laboratory techniques and anesthesia. JoLynn shares her house with her family, a St. Bernard, and a chocolate Labrador retriever.

The CAPC recommends fecal examination for adult dogs and cats at least twice per year.

Summer 2021, Clinical Pathology

How to Collect and Prepare Samples for the Laboratory

Barbie Papajeski MS, LVT, RLATG, VTS

Barbie teaches clinical pathology and laboratory animal courses in the veterinary technology program at Murray State University and is a continuing education instructor for the Veterinary Support Personnel Network. Before full-time teaching, she worked at the Breathitt Veterinary Center diagnostic laboratory. She currently serves as secretary of the Academy of Veterinary Clinical Pathology Technicians and the Kentucky Veterinary Technician Association. She resides in western Kentucky, near Land Between the Lakes, where she loves to hike with her 2 sons and husband. She shares her home with 3 dogs, 4 cats, and an assortment of feathered and scaled animals.

By researching and staying current with test requirements, veterinary nurses are instrumental in communicating preliminary preparation with clients and discussing with the veterinary team ways to reduce erroneous test results.

Summer 2020, Clinical Pathology

Ear Cytology: Sampling, Processing, and Microscopic Evaluation

Barbie Papajeski MS, LVT, RLATG, VTS

Barbie teaches clinical pathology and laboratory animal courses in the veterinary technology program at Murray State University and is a continuing education instructor for the Veterinary Support Personnel Network. Before full-time teaching, she worked at the Breathitt Veterinary Center diagnostic laboratory. She currently serves as secretary of the Academy of Veterinary Clinical Pathology Technicians and the Kentucky Veterinary Technician Association. She resides in western Kentucky, near Land Between the Lakes, where she loves to hike with her 2 sons and husband. She shares her home with 3 dogs, 4 cats, and an assortment of feathered and scaled animals.

A guide on when to perform ear cytology, how to collect ear cytology samples, and some of the common findings veterinary nurses encounter in dogs and cats.

Clinical Pathology, MDR1, Genetics, MDR1 Mutation,
Sep/Oct 2017, Clinical Pathology

MDR1 Genetic Testing: What You Need to Know

Rebecca Connors LVT | Washington State University

Rebecca has been employed at the Veterinary Clinical Pharmacology Laboratory at Washington State University since 2011. After graduation from the Michigan State University Veterinary Technology Program, she worked in several small- and mixed-animal veterinary practices in Michigan and Arizona. In 1996 she became the neurology technician at Washington State University’s Veterinary Teaching Hospital, followed by a 6-year stretch as a cardiology technician for Ohio State University’s Veterinary Medical Center. In 2008 she returned to Washington State University to work in veterinary genetics and Holter interpretation. She lives in Idaho with her husband, 2 sons, and a variety of dogs and cats.

Hidden in the genetic code of many herding-breed dogs is a mutation that increases their susceptibility to drug toxicosis. It is important for veterinary technicians to recognize which dogs are at risk and which drugs to avoid or administer with a reduced dose.

Many veterinary practices incorporate digital images of new patients when creating patient records. Veterinary practices also use digital imaging to document specific patient conditions and, increasingly, to obtain images in the radiology suite. Many practices take “before and after” images of patients undergoing dental procedures to provide visual evidence of treatment to clients. Photographs can be used to help explain concepts or disease conditions to pet owners, which may lead to increased client compliance. Digital images can also be used to share patient information during consultations with other veterinary professionals and to create an image library for teaching purposes.
Jan/Feb 2017, Clinical Pathology

Digital Microscopy

Margi Sirois EdD, MS, RVT, CVT, LAT | Ashworth College | Norcross, Georgia

Margi received her doctorate in instructional technology and distance education from Nova Southeastern University. She also holds an associate in applied science degree in veterinary technology, and bachelor’s and master’s degrees in biology. She is certified as a veterinary technician and a laboratory animal technician and has over 25 years of experience as a veterinary technician educator in both traditional and distance education programs. Dr. Sirois is program director for the veterinary technology program at Ashworth College and a frequent speaker at veterinary technician education conferences. She has numerous publications, including several textbooks for veterinary technicians. She is past-president of the Kansas Veterinary Technician Association and co-chair of the proposed Academy of Veterinary Technician Specialists in Education.

Adding digital microscopy to a veterinary practice can greatly enhance recordkeeping and serve as a valuable tool for client education. This article provides an overview of the benefits of this technology and some useful resources for learning more.

Laboratory tests are invaluable medical tools…if the results are reliable. Aside from sample collection and handling, many other factors can affect test outcomes, from patient stress to client misunderstanding. This article addresses the seemingly unimportant details that can have significant effects.
Sep/Oct 2016, Clinical Pathology

The Non-pathologic, Non-collection, and Non-sample Preanalytical Small “Stuff” That Influences Reliable Laboratory Results

Daniel J. Walsh MPS, LVT, RVT, VTS (Clinical Pathology) | Academy of Veterinary Clinical Pathology Technicians | West Lafayette, Indiana

Dan’s veterinary career began when he worked in a small animal practice during college. Upon graduation, he served in the Army as a Veterinary Care Specialist and had the privilege of caring for the Army mascot mules for a time. After discharge, he worked in mixed animal practice. Dan subsequently taught in the veterinary technology programs at SUNY Delhi for 28 years and Purdue University for over 11 years.

Dan holds an associate degree in veterinary technology; associate, bachelor’s, and master’s degrees in animal science; and a graduate certificate in veterinary homeland security. He is a member of several associations, including NAVTA and the Uniformed Veterinary Medical Association.

Laboratory tests are invaluable medical tools…if the results are reliable. Aside from sample collection and handling, many other factors can affect test outcomes, from patient stress to client misunderstanding. This article addresses the seemingly unimportant details that can have significant effects.

Veterinary Pathology
May/June 2016, Clinical Pathology

Preanalytic Variables: Effects on CBC and Serum Chemistry Results

Katie Foust BS, CVT | Pima Medical Institute, Tucson, Arizona

Katie earned an associate’s degree in science from Pima Community College in 2004 and a bachelor’s degree in veterinary science from the University of Arizona in 2008. She has been a certified veterinary technician in the state of Arizona since 2010 and has over 10 years of clinical experience in small and large animal practice and 5 years’ experience as a veterinary technician educator. As a board member of the Animal Welfare Alliance of Southern Arizona, she organizes and volunteers for community service events that provide free or low-cost preventive veterinary care for local pets. She also promotes pet health care awareness by speaking at public events, including community workshops and conventions. Currently, she is the clinical director for the veterinary technology program at Pima Medical Institute in Tucson, Arizona.

Margi Sirois EdD, MS, RVT, LAT | Ashworth College, Norcross, Georgia

Margi received her doctorate in instructional technology and distance education from Nova Southeastern University. She also holds an associate in applied science degree in veterinary technology, and bachelor’s and master’s degrees in biology. She is certified as a veterinary technician and a laboratory animal technician and has over 25 years of experience as a veterinary technician educator in both traditional and distance education programs. Dr. Sirois is program director for the veterinary technology program at Ashworth College and a frequent speaker at veterinary technician education conferences. She has numerous publications, including several textbooks for veterinary technicians. She is past-president of the Kansas Veterinary Technician Association and co-chair of the proposed Academy of Veterinary Technician Specialists in Education.

Complete blood counts (CBCs) and serum chemistry testing results can be influenced by several factors. This article gives an overview of some of the most common factors pertaining to sample handling.

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