fbpx
  • NAVC Brands

Rehabilitation

Continuing Education, Fall 2021, Featured, Rehabilitation

Key Components of Canine Gait Analysis in the Rehabilitation Exam

Wendy Davies CVT, CCRVN, VTS (Physical Rehabilitation)

Wendy has been a veterinary technician for more than 25 years. She began her career in a private practice setting before moving to the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine as an anesthesia technician. She was lucky enough to move around the veterinary college in different capacities, including research, orthopedics, and shelter medicine, and finally found her niche in rehabilitation. She helped develop the rehabilitation department at the university and has seen it grow and expand tremendously. Wendy is a charter member and the current president of the Academy of Physical Rehabilitation Veterinary Technicians.

The gait analysis is one of the most important components of a physical rehabilitation examination because it allows the veterinary nurse to narrow possible causes of an abnormal gait and help obtain a diagnosis.

TVN_Fall20_GeriatricRehab_MainImage
Fall 2020, Rehabilitation

Physical Rehabilitation for Geriatric Dogs Recovering from Injury or Surgery

Jessica Bowditch RVT, Purdue University Veterinary Teaching Hospital Lafayette, Indiana

Jessica Bowditch, RVT, provides clinical case work and teaches fundamentals of physical rehabilitation to veterinary technician students in the veterinary technician program at Purdue University. She received her associate of science degree in veterinary technology from Baker College in Jackson, Michigan, in 2013. She began working in the neurology and physical rehabilitation department at Purdue University as a registered veterinary technician in 2015. She is pursuing her credential as a Certified Canine Rehab Practitioner through the University of Tennessee.

The growth of veterinary medicine for geriatric patients provides an opportunity to incorporate more physical rehabilitation in veterinary hospitals. The rehabilitation veterinary nurse is an integral part of the rehabilitation team, helping to assess, develop, and implement the rehabilitation plan for each specific patient.

Summer 2019, Rehabilitation

Myofascial Trigger Points in Veterinary Patients

Lis Conarton BS, LVT, VTS (Physical Rehabilitation)

Lis received her bachelor’s degree from Ithaca College and earned her license in veterinary technology shortly after joining the Veterinary Medical Center of CNY’s team. She developed the physical rehabilitation service at the Veterinary Medical Center of CNY and, in 2010, initiated the center’s pain management service. Lis has lectured at professional veterinary conferences nationally and routinely contributes to newspaper articles, journal submissions, and book chapters regarding physical rehabilitation and pain management. She has received special training in Canine Myofascial Trigger Point Therapy through Myopain Seminars and has a special interest in myofascial issues and muscle dysfunction.

A veterinary nurse’s goal is to teach clients tools to promote reduction in Myofascial Trigger Point activation in their pets, thereby relieving pain and providing better outcomes and successful, long-lasting treatments.

Hydrotherapy for Animals
News, Rehabilitation

Pet Rehabilitation Center Expands Hydrotherapy Program

Patricia Wuest Vice President of Media Strategy, NAVC

Hydrotherapy is beneficial for dogs suffering from arthritic pain or recovering from surgery. That’s because water therapy allows a dog to exercise comfortably while minimizing discomfort. One Los Angeles facility, Two Hands Four Paws, has just expanded its water therapy options for patients by adding a third water treadmill and installing a full-size pool. Two …

Summer 2018, Integrative/Alternative Medicine , Rehabilitation

Photobiomodulation Therapy: Healing at the Speed of Light

Renaud "Ren" Houyoux LVT, Companion Animal Health, Newark, Delaware

Ren is a licensed veterinary technician from Reno, Nevada. Credentialed in 1998 after graduating from the Bel-Rea Institute in Denver, Colorado, Ren has dedicated himself enthusiastically to veterinary medicine. Since that time, he has worked from coast to coast in both general practice and specialty facilities. In the past several years, he has taken a particular interest in the field of photobiomodulation therapy as this dynamic modality continues to rapidly evolve and has proven itself to be a vital part of veterinary practice. Ren teaches, writes, and speaks on the subject at conferences and educational seminars.

This article discusses some of the basics of photomodulation therapy (PBMT), such as the veterinary nurse’s role, dosing, promoting a fear-free environment, and integration into practice. Photobiomodulation therapy remains an evolving aspect of medicine. Because we now have powerful units using appropriate wavelengths, which enable clinically significant results, the next few years will eclipse use …

Spring 2018, Rehabilitation

Atlanto-Occipital Luxation in a Caprine Patient

Jessica Bowditch RVT, Purdue University Veterinary Teaching Hospital Lafayette, Indiana

Jessica Bowditch, RVT, provides clinical case work and teaches fundamentals of physical rehabilitation to veterinary technician students in the veterinary technician program at Purdue University. She received her associate of science degree in veterinary technology from Baker College in Jackson, Michigan, in 2013. She began working in the neurology and physical rehabilitation department at Purdue University as a registered veterinary technician in 2015. She is pursuing her credential as a Certified Canine Rehab Practitioner through the University of Tennessee.

Patient is placed in a body sling and patient lift. Assisted standing and walking improve circulation and respiration, strengthen and re-educate the muscles, and encourage neuromuscular function.

Luxating Patellas: Pathology and Treatment Options
July/Aug 2017, Rehabilitation

Luxating Patellas: Pathology and Treatment Options

Maria Maddox LVT, CCRP, AMCP

Maria Maddox, LVT, CCRP, AMCP, received her bachelor’s degree in biology from Bryn Mawr College and her associate’s degree from Bel-Rea Institute of Animal Technology. She is a licensed veterinary technician in Colorado, Nevada, and Georgia, and earned her certification as a Canine Physical Rehabilitation Practitioner (CCRP) in 2006 from the University of Tennessee. She is the Membership Chair of the Academy of Physical Rehabilitation Veterinary Technicians. Her professional interests include nutrition and hospice care. Having recently moved to Georgia, she is starting her own business, subcontracting with local veterinarians to provide physical rehabilitation to their canine and feline patients.

Patellar luxation is one of the most common hindlimb orthopedic abnormalities seen in dogs. This article discusses the anatomy, diagnosis, management, and other aspects of patellar luxation with which veterinary technicians should be familiar.

Feline Physical Rehabilitation
Nov/Dec 2016, Rehabilitation

Feline Physical Rehabilitation

Mary Ellen Goldberg BS, LVT, CVT, SRA, CCRA | Canine Rehabilitation Institute, Wellington, FL

Mary Ellen is a graduate of Harcum College and the University of Pennsylvania. She has been an instructor of anesthesia and pain management for VetMedTeam since 2003. In 2007, she became a surgical research anesthetist certified through the Academy of Surgical Research. In 2008, she became the executive secretary of the International Veterinary Academy of Pain Management. In addition, she is on the Proposed Organizing Committee for the Academy of Physical Rehabilitation Veterinary Technicians for the formation of a NAVTA recognized VTS-physical rehabilitation program.

Mary Ellen has written several books and contributed to numerous chapters regarding anesthesia, pain management, and rehabilitation. She has worked in various aspects of veterinary medicine ranging from small animal to zoo animal medicine.

Although rehabilitation is more commonly used for dogs, cats can also benefit from many of the same techniques—even swimming! Learn more about the whats, hows, and whys of feline physical rehabilitation.

March/April 2016, Rehabilitation

The Resilience of Animals

Wendy Davies CVT, CCRA | University of Florida

Animals have always been a huge part of my life. Growing up on a dairy farm in upstate New York, I was the kid who brought stray animals home in the hope I could keep them. As I got older, I knew that a job working with animals was what I wanted.

Rehabilitation
March/April 2016, Rehabilitation

Getting Started in Physical Rehabilitation

Mary Ellen Goldberg BS, LVT, CVT, SRA, CCRA | Canine Rehabilitation Institute, Wellington, FL

Mary Ellen is a graduate of Harcum College and the University of Pennsylvania. She has been an instructor of anesthesia and pain management for VetMedTeam since 2003. In 2007, she became a surgical research anesthetist certified through the Academy of Surgical Research. In 2008, she became the executive secretary of the International Veterinary Academy of Pain Management. In addition, she is on the Proposed Organizing Committee for the Academy of Physical Rehabilitation Veterinary Technicians for the formation of a NAVTA recognized VTS-physical rehabilitation program.

Mary Ellen has written several books and contributed to numerous chapters regarding anesthesia, pain management, and rehabilitation. She has worked in various aspects of veterinary medicine ranging from small animal to zoo animal medicine.

Physical rehabilitation is an exciting and challenging field in which veterinary technicians can develop new skills and grow in their career development. Over the past decade, awareness of animal physical rehabilitation has increased, and rehabilitation has become a rapidly growing service within veterinary specialty hospitals, referral centers, and primary care practices.

MENU