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Ophthalmology

Continuing Education, Featured, Spring 2021, Ophthalmology

Managing Canine Corneal Ulcers

Pam Kirby RVT, VTS (Ophthalmology)

Pam graduated from Purdue University’s veterinary technology program in 1997. She has been employed at Purdue University ever since, first in the small animal intensive care unit and then in the veterinary ophthalmology department. Pam’s special interests include large animal ophthalmology, ocular imaging, and surgery. She also enjoys teaching veterinary and veterinary nursing students on the clinic floor, in the classroom, in labs, and online. Pam has served on the executive board of the Veterinary Ophthalmic Technician Society as vice president and unseated board member. She is a charter member and current secretary of the Academy of Veterinary Ophthalmic Technicians. She enjoys continuing to learn as much as she can about veterinary ophthalmic nursing.

This review examines corneal anatomy and physiology, basic classifications of corneal ulcers, what owners need to know about caring for dogs with ulcers, and monitoring patients with corneal ulcers.

Summer 2020, Ophthalmology

Cataracts in Dogs: The Importance of Early Detection and Management

Tyler Grogan RVT, CVT

Tyler is currently working in Florida as a relief veterinary nurse in areas including ophthalmology, emergency medicine, and general practice. Tyler also works with the Uncharted Veterinary Conference, contributing to their social media marketing. Tyler’s clinical interests include ophthalmology, anesthesia, low-stress handling, and the human-animal bond. She is also passionate about providing veterinary teams an opportunity at wellness in practice through her relief services, SOS Vet Relief. Tyler has written articles for several online publications on topics from client communication to mental wellness in the profession.

Veterinary nurses play a very important role in educating the client about cataracts in dogs and the options for sight-restoration.

Winter 2020, Ophthalmology

Sudden Acquired Retinal Degeneration Syndrome: An Overview

Pam Kirby RVT, VTS (Ophthalmology)

Pam graduated from Purdue University’s veterinary technology program in 1997. She has been employed at Purdue University ever since, first in the small animal intensive care unit and then in the veterinary ophthalmology department. Pam’s special interests include large animal ophthalmology, ocular imaging, and surgery. She also enjoys teaching veterinary and veterinary nursing students on the clinic floor, in the classroom, in labs, and online. Pam has served on the executive board of the Veterinary Ophthalmic Technician Society as vice president and unseated board member. She is a charter member and current secretary of the Academy of Veterinary Ophthalmic Technicians. She enjoys continuing to learn as much as she can about veterinary ophthalmic nursing.

Sudden acquired retinal degeneration syndrome (SARDS) is a permanently blinding disease that occurs suddenly. It is one of the leading causes of incurable canine vision loss diagnosed by veterinary ophthalmologists.

Winter 2020, Ophthalmology

An ECG Through the Eye?

Holly Kitchen CVT, VTS (Ophthalmology)

Holly practices in the Ophthalmology Service at the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine. In 2005, Holly graduated from Wells College with a BS in Biochemistry and Microbiology. She earned her CVT in 2013, and her VTS from the Academy of Veterinary Ophthalmic Technicians in 2017. She and 8 other members became the first VTS technicians in the field of veterinary ophthalmology. Holly lectures annually at her institution’s Technician Continuing Education Conference and has presented at the Ophthalmology Technician Continuing Education Conference. Her passions include helping educate future veterinarians, veterinary ophthalmologists and veterinary nurses, and advocating for her patients.

This case report describes an abnormal electroretinogram (ERG) obtained from a patient with a pacemaker and a diagnosis of sudden acquired retinal degeneration syndrome (SARDS). SARDS is one of the most frustrating ocular diseases seen in veterinary medicine.

Canine Uveitis and the Veterinary Technician
July/Aug 2017, Ophthalmology

Canine Uveitis and the Veterinary Technician

Sondra Kuruts BS, LVT | Veterinary Eye Center | Austin, Texas

Sondra graduated with a bachelor’s degree in veterinary technology from Mercy College in Dobbs Ferry, New York, in 2006. She passed her licensing exam in Texas in January 2007. Since then she has worked at Veterinary Eye Center, PLLC, in Austin.

She lives with her husband, a crazy 2-year-old, 2 dogs, 2 cats and a sulphur-crested cockatoo in Round Rock, Texas. She hopes to pursue her specialty in veterinary ophthalmology in 2018.

Uveitis can be not only a confusing and frustrating diagnosis for owners, but also a sign of underlying, potentially zoonotic disease. This article provides an overview of essential information for assisting clients and protecting the veterinary team.

The Hairy Eyeball
March/April 2016, Ophthalmology

The Hairy Eyeball: What’s Your Culprit?

Shannon Daley BS | Portland Veterinary Specialists | Portland, Maine

Shannon’s love for animals started long before she got into veterinary medicine. She attended University of Southern Maine to earn her bachelor’s degree in biology. Shortly after graduation, she started working in the animal field and became a veterinary technician with on-the-job learning. Her veterinary career began 6 years ago in a general practice, and she has been with Portland Veterinary Specialists for the past 2 years.

Shannon says, “I couldn’t be happier in the field I have chosen. I get to have animals as patients throughout the day, aiding in their care, and also get to come home to my personal 4-legged kids. Life in the veterinary medicine field, in my opinion, is as good as it gets.”

Ocular problems are often described as “red” and “irritated” eyes. Myriad problems can present as “red eye.” Commonly missed causes of red eye are irritants that arise from the eye itself. Surprisingly, in practice, it seems that the most common causes are not external irritants or trauma, but rather abnormal hairs arising from the eyelids or periocular region.

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