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Practice Management

The Case for Veterinary Midlevel Professionals
Nov/Dec 2016, Practice Management

The Case for Veterinary Midlevel Professionals

Kenichiro Yagi MS, RVT, VTS (ECC, SAIM)

Ken has spent nearly 20 years in practice. He obtained his VTS certification in emergency and critical care, as well as small animal internal medicine, and earned his master’s degree in Veterinary Science. He served as ICU Manager and Blood Bank Manager at Adobe Animal Hospital until 2018, and is now Program Director for the RECOVER CPR Initiative and simulation lab manager of the Park Veterinary Innovation Laboratory at Cornell University. He co-chairs the Veterinary Nurse Initiative and serves as a board member of the Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society, the Academy of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Technicians, and the Veterinary Innovation Council.

Mandy Fults MS, LVT, CVPP, VTS-CP (Canine/Feline)

Mandy has over 17 years of experience as a Licensed Veterinary Technician (LVT). She obtained her certification as a Veterinary Technician Specialist (VTS) in Canine/Feline Clinical Practice in 2011 and is a Certified Veterinary Pain Practitioner (CVPP). She obtained a master’s degree in veterinary biomedical science in 2018 through the University of Missouri. She is employed by Comanche Trail Veterinary Center in Liberty Hill, Texas, as the veterinary nursing supervisor. Her primary interest is internal medicine, with endocrinology as her passion, and is an active advocate for the advancement of the veterinary nurse profession.

This year, the 13th veterinary technician specialty—ophthalmology—was recognized by NAVTA. Is time for a new level of veterinary technician? This article looks at the parallels in the growth of the veterinary technician and nursing professions.

Becoming a “Cat-Friendly” Practice
Sep/Oct 2016, Practice Management

Becoming a “Cat-Friendly” Practice

Esther Klok Dierenkliniek Winsum | The Netherlands

Esther Klok, a veterinary technician at Dierenkliniek Winsum in the Netherlands, previously described her passion for bringing new ideas from the NAVC Conference home to her clinic in 3 articles in 2016 (available on TodaysVeterinaryTechnician.com). In this article, she outlines how her clinic designed a program that not only helps dogs with noise anxiety, but also improves the human–animal bond and has even increased community awareness of how noises affect animals.

Even though I am a dog and horse lover, I admit that becoming a cat-friendly practice is one of the best changes my clinic has made in the 22 years I have worked there.

This article from the British journal Feline Focus describes one clinic’s experience in—and benefits from—making the effort to become “feline friendly.”
Sep/Oct 2016, Practice Management

How Being Cat Friendly Has Made a Difference in Our Practice

Sarah Dawson RVN | Walton Vale Vets4Pets, Liverpool, UK

Sarah Dawson started work in veterinary practice in 2005 and at present is the Head Nurse and Cat Advocate for Walton Vale Vets4Pets in Liverpool, UK. She recently completed the ISFM Certificate in Feline Friendly Nursing with Distinction. Sarah was integral in implementing the Cat Friendly Clinic scheme in her practice, which was awarded silver, and she is working hard to change this to gold.

This article from the British journal Feline Focus describes one clinic’s experience in—and benefits from—making the effort to become “feline friendly.”

Tips and Tricks to Rev Up Your Client Service Game
July/Aug 2016, Practice Management

Tips and Tricks to Rev Up Your Client Customer Service Game

Heather Prendergast RVT, CVPM

Heather has spent over 25 years in small animal practice, teaches veterinary technology and assistance programs, and is the author of Front Office Management for the Veterinary Team. She lectures on topics ranging from grief management for health care professionals to nutrition, inventory, communications, and veterinary team management. She has also written several articles and participated in published roundtable discussions on these topics.

Currently, Heather provides consulting services for veterinary hospitals and is an instructor for Patterson Veterinary University and VetMedTeam. She serves on several advisory committees and is the Program Chair of the Technician Program at the North American Veterinary Conference. Heather was named the 2014 Veterinary Technician of the Year and Continuing Educator of the Year for 2016 at the Western Veterinary Conference.

Often, veterinary technicians and assistants miss opportunities with clients that could enhance the client relationship and bond, ultimately leading to better patient care. It is up to each individual to capture the moment and create a positive experience for every client and patient every time they visit the practice.

After a long day of listening to presentations at the NAVC Conference in Orlando, in a language other than my own, I was lying on the bed in my hotel room, thinking about how I, a young vet tech, had ended up in the United States, far from home.
July/Aug 2016, Practice Management

Starting Veterinary Technician Appointments

Esther Klok Dierenkliniek Winsum | The Netherlands

Esther Klok, a veterinary technician at Dierenkliniek Winsum in the Netherlands, previously described her passion for bringing new ideas from the NAVC Conference home to her clinic in 3 articles in 2016 (available on TodaysVeterinaryTechnician.com). In this article, she outlines how her clinic designed a program that not only helps dogs with noise anxiety, but also improves the human–animal bond and has even increased community awareness of how noises affect animals.

After a long day of listening to presentations at the NAVC Conference in Orlando, in a language other than my own, I was lying on the bed in my hotel room, thinking about how I, a young vet tech, had ended up in the United States, far from home.

May/June 2016, Practice Management

Looking Forward, Looking Back: The Veterinary Technology Profession

Harold Davis RVT, VTS (ECC, Anesthesia & Analgesia), President-Elect, North American Veterinary Community

Harold is a veterinary practice educational consultant and former manager of the emergency and critical care service at the UC Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital. He is a co-founder of the Academy of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Technicians, a charter member of the Academy of Veterinary Technicians in Anesthesia and Analgesia, and the past president of the Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society. He currently serves as President-elect on the Board of Directors for the NAVC. In addition, he is a Member-at-Large of the Board of Directors for the National Association of Veterinary Technicians in America. He has spoken at events in 12 countries and has published several book chapters and journal articles.

Harold Davis, BA, RVT, VTS (ECC, Anesthesia and Analgesia) shares his perspective on the past and future of veterinary technicians.

May/June 2016, Practice Management

Helping Pets Enjoy Their Golden Years: The Technician’s Role

Heather Lynch LVT | BluePearl Veterinary Partners, Gilbert, Arizona

Heather is the supervising technician at BluePearl Veterinary Partners in Gilbert, Arizona. She is a frequent lecturer at state and national veterinary conferences and is the author of several articles on nutrition, patient care, and management of diabetes.

With improved wellness care, more pets are reaching their senior years. To help ensure good quality of life for aging pets, veterinary technicians should be knowledgeable about signs of emerging chronic illnesses and special considerations for nursing geriatric patients.

Management
May/June 2016, Practice Management

So You’ve Been Promoted to Management … Now What?

Sandy Walsh RVT, CVPM

Sandy is a veterinary practice management consultant, instructor, speaker, and advisor with over 35 years of experience in the veterinary field. She is dedicated to improving hospital operations through coaching and sharing appropriate practice management techniques to the whole team. Sandy still works in a small animal practice and is an active member of the Veterinary Hospital Managers Association, NAVTA, VetPartners, Sacramento Valley Veterinary Practice Managers Association, Sacramento Valley Veterinary Technician Association, and the CVMA. She is an instructor for Patterson Veterinary University and a former hospital inspector for the California Veterinary Medical Board.

If you have not been trained as a manager, it can be difficult to make the transition into a management role. This article provides tips and resources for newly promoted managers.

Career Challenges
March/April 2016, Practice Management

Creating Altitude in Your Career

Jennifer Yurkon CVT | Altitude Veterinary Consulting | Wellington, Colorado

Jennifer grew up on a dairy farm in Western New York, where she quickly learned that she loved to take care of animals. In SUNY Delhi’s Veterinary Science Technology program, she discovered that she not only enjoyed being part of a nursing team, but also had a knack for leading one. Since that time, she has taken on many leadership roles in veterinary medicine.

Jennifer and her husband are owned by an Australian shepherd, Roo; a Boston terrier, Zoom; two cats, Stinger and Chewy; and a “very boisterous” guinea pig, Miss Piggy. They are both active in the Larimer County 4H program, especially with meat quality assurance and dairy cattle projects, and attend numerous continuing education meetings for veterinary medicine.

The veterinary technician profession is not only emotionally and mentally challenging, it also takes a physical toll. Many of us concentrate so hard on being a great veterinary technician that we don’t think about the physical demands until it is too late. Fortunately, there are opportunities for advancement within our profession that allow us to escape some of the physical stress, yet still work closely with clients, pets, and our team.

Jan/Feb 2016, Personal/Professional Development , Practice Management

Keeping It Fresh: How to Rejuvenate Your Career

Jennifer Yurkon CVT | Altitude Veterinary Consulting | Wellington, Colorado

Jennifer grew up on a dairy farm in Western New York, where she quickly learned that she loved to take care of animals. In SUNY Delhi’s Veterinary Science Technology program, she discovered that she not only enjoyed being part of a nursing team, but also had a knack for leading one. Since that time, she has taken on many leadership roles in veterinary medicine.

Jennifer and her husband are owned by an Australian shepherd, Roo; a Boston terrier, Zoom; two cats, Stinger and Chewy; and a “very boisterous” guinea pig, Miss Piggy. They are both active in the Larimer County 4H program, especially with meat quality assurance and dairy cattle projects, and attend numerous continuing education meetings for veterinary medicine.

Would you like to be more appreciated for, challenged by, and rewarded for the way you take care of your patients, educate clients, assist your teammates, and build your current practice?

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