Spring 2019

News, Spring 2019,

Honoring the Best: Dr. Earl H. Rippie Veterinary Nurse Awards

Kara M. Burns MS, MEd, LVT, VTS (Nutrition), VTS-H (Internal Medicine, Dentistry), Editor in Chief, Director of Veterinary Nursing

Kara Burns is an LVT with master’s degrees in physiology and counseling psychology. She began her career in human medicine working as an emergency psychologist and a poison specialist for humans and animals. Kara is the founder and president of the Academy of Veterinary Nutrition Technicians and has attained her VTS (Nutrition). She is the director of veterinary nursing for the NAVC as well as the editor in chief of Today’s Veterinary Nurse. She also works as an independent nutritional consultant, and is the immediate past president of NAVTA. She has authored many articles, textbooks, and textbook chapters and is an internationally invited speaker, focusing on topics of nutrition, leadership, and technician utilization.

This year’s recipients of the the Dr. Earl H. Rippie Veterinary Nurse Leadership Scholarship were presented at VMX 2019 in Orlando.

Spring 2019, Personal/Professional Development

Be a Force for Change and “Show Up”

Heather Prendergast RVT, CVPM

Heather has spent over 25 years in small animal practice, teaches veterinary technology and assistance programs, and is the author of Front Office Management for the Veterinary Team. She lectures on topics ranging from grief management for health care professionals to nutrition, inventory, communications, and veterinary team management. She has also written several articles and participated in published roundtable discussions on these topics.

Currently, Heather provides consulting services for veterinary hospitals and is an instructor for Patterson Veterinary University and VetMedTeam. She serves on several advisory committees and is the Program Chair of the Technician Program at the North American Veterinary Conference. Heather was named the 2014 Veterinary Technician of the Year and Continuing Educator of the Year for 2016 at the Western Veterinary Conference.

Kenichiro Yagi MS, RVT, VTS (ECC, SAIM)

Ken has spent nearly 20 years in practice. He obtained his VTS certification in emergency and critical care, as well as small animal internal medicine, and earned his master’s degree in Veterinary Science. He served as ICU Manager and Blood Bank Manager at Adobe Animal Hospital until 2018, and is now Program Director for the RECOVER CPR Initiative and simulation lab manager of the Park Veterinary Innovation Laboratory at Cornell University. He co-chairs the Veterinary Nurse Initiative and serves as a board member of the Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society, the Academy of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Technicians, and the Veterinary Innovation Council.

It’s an exciting time for the veterinary nursing and technology profession—never before has the veterinary field been so focused on improving the sustainability of a career in veterinary nursing. Are you part of the movement?

Featured, Spring 2019, Toxicology

Illicit Drugs: What Veterinary Nurses Need to Know

Erin Freed CVT, BAS | ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center

Erin has been employed with the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (APCC) since 2006. She earned her associate’s degree in applied science in veterinary technology from Parkland Community College and her bachelor’s degree in applied science in veterinary hospital management from St. Petersburg College in 2016. Erin’s interests include toxicology, but her true passion is sharing knowledge and educating veterinary staff. She has been an instructor for a toxicology continuing education (CE) course for the Veterinary Support Personnel Network and has spoken at several APCC CE conferences. Erin has had peer-reviewed articles published in Veterinary Technician, the NAVTA Journal, and Veterinary Medicine and has authored a chapter on the renal system in Small Animal Toxicology Essentials.

Marijuana, amphetamines, cocaine, heroin, and hallucinogenic mushrooms are five of the most common illicit drugs companion animals are exposed to. Here is everything you need to know about them.

Spring 2019, Integrative/Alternative Medicine , Nutrition

Prebiotics and Probiotics for Dogs and Cats

Ann Wortinger BIS, LVT, VTS (ECC, SAIM, Nutrition)

Ann is a 1983 graduate of Michigan State University and got her specialty certification in Emergency/ Critical Care in 2000, in Small Animal Internal Medicine in 2008 and in Nutrition in 2013. In 2017 she attained her Fear Free Level on certification, and has since moved into level 2.

She has worked in general, emergency, specialty practice, education and management. Ann is active in her state, national and specialty organizations, and served on the organizing committees for Internal Medicine and Nutrition. She has mentored over 20 fellow VTSs and has worked on a variety of committees and positions. She is currently an instructor and Academic Advisor for Ashworth College’s Veterinary Technology Program, as well as an active speaker and writer.

Ann has over 50 published articles in various professional magazines as well as book chapters and a book, Nutrition and Disease Management for Veterinary Technicians and Nurses in its second edition in 2016 coauthored with Kara Burns. Ann received the 2009 Service Award for her state association (MAVT), the 2010 Achievement Award for the Academy of Internal Medicine for Veterinary Technicians (AIMVT), and in 2012 received the Jack L. Mara Memorial Lecture Award presented at NAVC.

Her fur/feather/fin family consists of 4 cats, 2 domestic geese, 14 chickens and a pond full of goldfish.

It can be challenging to find nutraceuticals that do what their manufacturers say they do — here’s what’s behind the hype of probiotics and prebiotics.

Spring 2019, Practice Management

The Importance of Veterinary Technicians

Abbie Hathaway CVT | Banfield Pet Hospital, Vancouver, Wash.

Abbie’s career in veterinary medicine began nearly 12 years ago, following her undergraduate studies at the University of Southern California. After gaining experience in retail management, Abbie started as a veterinary assistant, then earned her veterinary technician credentials and evolved her leadership skills as a practice manager. In her current role as Program Manager of Veterinary Technician Training, Abbie supports current and aspiring veterinary technicians across Banfield Pet Hospital’s more than 1000 hospitals nationwide to help create healthy workplace environments and enable lifelong careers.

By respecting and empowering veterinary technicians, we all benefit: clients tend to be more engaged and well-informed, and the health and wellbeing of their pets may also benefit as a result.

Spring 2019, Personal/Professional Development

Simulation Training — Just Like the Real Thing

Maggie Monza LVT Oradell Animal Hospital, Paramus, NJ

Maggie has a bachelor’s degree in veterinary technology and is a Licensed Veterinary Technician. She is an active member of the Association of Veterinary Technician Educators (AVTE) and National Association of Veterinary Technicians in America (NAVTA). She serves on the education committee of New Jersey Veterinary Technicians and Assistants (NJVTA). She works at Oradell Animal Hospital and is an adjunct professor at Bergen Community College.

Harriet Terodemos MS, CVT Bergen Community College Paramus, NJ

Harriet has a master’s degree in biology from Montclair State University and a bachelor’s degree in animal science from Purdue University. She received her associate’s degree in veterinary technology from San Juan College. She has been an instructor with the veterinary technology program at Bergen Community College for 17 years. She is an active member of the New Jersey Veterinary Technicians and Assistants (NJVTA).

Simulation training can help veterinary nurses develop the skills and confidence to explain and perform certain clinical procedures such as obtaining intraocular pressure or cystocentesis.

Continuing Education, Featured, Spring 2019, Anesthesiology

Anesthesia for Geriatric Patients

Trish Farry CVN, AVN, VTS (ECC, Anesthesia & Analgesia), TAA GCHEd | School of Veterinary Science at The University of Queensland, Australia

Trish Farry is an Australian certified nurse with specialist qualifications in emergency and critical care and anesthesia. She is an associate lecturer and clinical instructor in anesthesia within the School of Veterinary Science at The University of Queensland in Australia and co-coordinates the final year of BAppSci (Veterinary Technology) program. Her areas of teaching include emergency medicine, anesthesia, analgesia, and clinical practices for undergraduate veterinary and veterinary technology students.

Wendy Goodwin BVSc, PhD, FANZCVS (Veterinary Anaesthesia, Critical Care) | School of Veterinary Science at The University of Queensland, Australia

Wendy is a veterinarian with a PhD and specialist qualifications in veterinary anesthesia and critical care. She works at the School of Veterinary Science, University of Queensland, Australia, as a clinical anesthetist, lecturer, and researcher in the areas of anesthesia, analgesia, and critical care.

Older patients may appear “healthy” for their age, but they often have multiple underlying organ dysfunctions that, when challenged by general anesthesia, can result in a cascade of detrimental events. This CE course will help you create an appropriate anesthesia plan for the geriatric patient.

Featured, Spring 2019, Oncology

Canine Digit Osteosarcoma Results in Toe Amputation

Stephani Hrabnicky LVT

Stephani obtained her license in 2013 after earning a bachelor’s of science degree in veterinary technology from Michigan State University. She got her start in general practice, but has spent the past 3 years dedicated to the busy surgery department of BluePearl Veterinary Partners in Southfield, Michigan, where she is currently the primary nurse for her surgeon. When not in the operating room, she can be found planning for a future VTS in anesthesia and analgesia.

A dog’s digits are amputated for reasons ranging from osteomyelitis to benign masses to SCC and melanoma. Bella’s case was the author’s first experience with a diagnosis of digit osteosarcoma.

Featured, Spring 2019, Toxicology

Guide to Managing Toxin Ingestion

Courtney Waxman BAS, CVT, RVT, VTS (ECC)

Courtney has worked in emergency and specialty veterinary practice for almost 15 years. Her areas of special interest include CPR, mechanical ventilation, one-on-one case management, critical care nursing, critical thinking, and technician/nurse training. She currently works as an instructor for Purdue University’s Veterinary Nursing Distance Learning Program and in the veterinary teaching hospital’s intensive care unit. She lectures nationally and internationally on topics relating to emergency and critical care and has been published in several veterinary technician/nursing journals. In 2019, Courtney was awarded New Educator of the Year by the Association of Veterinary Technician Educators.

Companion animals are susceptible to several potentially life-threatening toxicants, ranging from human food and medication to animal medication, common plants, illicit drugs, routine household products, and more. Is your veterinary clinic prepared?

Spring 2019, Personal/Professional Development , Practice Management

You’ve Been Promoted! Now What?

Heather Prendergast RVT, CVPM

Heather has spent over 25 years in small animal practice, teaches veterinary technology and assistance programs, and is the author of Front Office Management for the Veterinary Team. She lectures on topics ranging from grief management for health care professionals to nutrition, inventory, communications, and veterinary team management. She has also written several articles and participated in published roundtable discussions on these topics.

Currently, Heather provides consulting services for veterinary hospitals and is an instructor for Patterson Veterinary University and VetMedTeam. She serves on several advisory committees and is the Program Chair of the Technician Program at the North American Veterinary Conference. Heather was named the 2014 Veterinary Technician of the Year and Continuing Educator of the Year for 2016 at the Western Veterinary Conference.

The road to a positive work environment is paved with respect for one another. For the veterinary team leader that road comes with speed bumps—all of which can be overcome with superior leadership, respect, integrity, and enthusiasm.

Spring 2019, Ethics/Welfare , Personal/Professional Development

Changing Animal Welfare on Native Reservations

Erin A. Spencer MEd, CVT, VTS (ECC)

Erin has a degree in veterinary technology (2001) and a master’s degree in education (2015). She earned her veterinary technician specialty in emergency and critical care in 2011. In 2009, Erin began volunteering with the Rural Area Veterinary Services program; in 2012, she accepted a full-time role. Erin spends 4 weeks each summer participating in field clinics on Native reservations in western states. Currently an assistant professor at the University of Massachusetts Veterinary Technology program, Erin is past president of the Massachusetts Veterinary Technician Association and the current president of National Association of Veterinary Technicians in America (NAVTA).

Rural Area Veterinary Services provides free veterinary care to underserved communities located in Native American reservations in the western U.S. It was life-changing for the author.

veterinary nurse burnout
Spring 2019, Personal Wellbeing

How to Avoid Burnout in Veterinary Nursing

Emily Fullerton RVT, VTS (Oncology) | VCA Veterinary Referral Associates | Gaithersburg, Maryland

Emily obtained her associate’s degree from Vet Tech Institute in December 2008, leading her to her registered veterinary technician license in January 2009. She subsequently moved to Maryland, where she found her place in veterinary medicine: medical oncology. With her passion for helping animals and support from her coworkers, she achieved her Veterinary Technician Specialist certification in oncology in 2014. Emily has a love of  food and wine, her own fuzzy pets, and spending time with her family.

Burnout prevention in the veterinary profession does not only fall on the shoulders of employers. Veterinary nurses are caregivers, but in addition to helping patients, they need to care for themselves and their colleagues.

Spring 2019, Practice Management

Happy Visits and Victory Visits — Helping Patients Be Fear Free℠

Monique Feyrecilde BA, LVT, VTS (Behavior)

Monique is a Veterinary Technician Specialist in behavior, working full time in small animal practice near Seattle, Washington. Monique strives to provide pragmatic solutions based on her extensive practical experience to groups of every size, from individual clients and clinics to the largest of veterinary conferences. When strangers ask what she does, Monique answers, “I teach veterinary professionals how to fulfill their love of animals by empowering them to be kind to patients.” In addition to writing for online courses, magazines, and journals, Monique released her first book, Cooperative Veterinary Care, in April 2018.

Protecting the emotional welfare of pets and people while providing excellent medical care to help restore physical health, prevent animal disease, and prevent suffering is the foundation of Fear Free veterinary care. Why not try these techniques?

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