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Nutrition

Fall 2019, Nutrition

Catabolism in the Critical Patient

Kara M. Burns MS, MEd, LVT, VTS (Nutrition), VTS-H (Internal Medicine, Dentistry), Editor in Chief

Kara Burns is an LVT with master’s degrees in physiology and counseling psychology. She began her career in human medicine working as an emergency psychologist and a poison specialist for humans and animals. Kara is the founder and president of the Academy of Veterinary Nutrition Technicians and has attained her VTS (Nutrition). She is the editor in chief of Today’s Veterinary Nurse. She also works as an independent nutritional consultant, and is the immediate past president of NAVTA. She has authored many articles, textbooks, and textbook chapters and is an internationally invited speaker, focusing on topics of nutrition, leadership, and technician utilization.

Greater awareness of cachexia will help provide practical approaches to managing body weight and lean body mass in dogs and cats, as well as more directed targets for treatment.

overweight cat
News, Nutrition

Study: How Cats’ Weights Change Over Time

“The monitoring of body weight is an important indicator of health in both humans and animals,” says one of the study authors. “It’s a data point that is commonly collected at each medical appointment, is simple to monitor at home, and is an easy point of entry into data-driven animal wellness.”

Summer 2019, Nutrition

Alternative Ways to Discuss Pet Obesity and Weight Loss

Jessie Nelson AAS, CVT, VTS (Nutrition)

Jessie graduated in 2009 from National American University with an Associate’s Degree in Applied Science with an emphasis in veterinary technology. After graduation, she worked in general practice in South Dakota. In 2010, she moved to Arizona and joined Desert Veterinary Medical Specialists in 2012. She found a passion for veterinary nutrition and earned a VTS in nutrition. Jessie was the president of the student chapter of NAVTA while in college, and has continued to be an active member of NAVTA and of the American Academy of Veterinary Nutrition Technicians. In her free time she loves to be outside with her pets, riding her bicycle, reading, and swimming with her dogs in the pool.

Veterinary teams need to find alternative ways to avoid upsetting their clients and to gain their trust in communicating the best nutritional requirements for their patients.

Spring 2019, Integrative/Alternative Medicine , Nutrition

Prebiotics and Probiotics for Dogs and Cats

Ann Wortinger BIS, LVT, VTS (ECC, SAIM, Nutrition)

Ann is a 1983 graduate of Michigan State University and got her specialty certification in Emergency/ Critical Care in 2000, in Small Animal Internal Medicine in 2008 and in Nutrition in 2013. In 2017 she attained her Fear Free Level on certification, and has since moved into level 2.

She has worked in general, emergency, specialty practice, education and management. Ann is active in her state, national and specialty organizations, and served on the organizing committees for Internal Medicine and Nutrition. She has mentored over 20 fellow VTSs and has worked on a variety of committees and positions. She is currently an instructor and Academic Advisor for Ashworth College’s Veterinary Technology Program, as well as an active speaker and writer.

Ann has over 50 published articles in various professional magazines as well as book chapters and a book, Nutrition and Disease Management for Veterinary Technicians and Nurses in its second edition in 2016 coauthored with Kara Burns. Ann received the 2009 Service Award for her state association (MAVT), the 2010 Achievement Award for the Academy of Internal Medicine for Veterinary Technicians (AIMVT), and in 2012 received the Jack L. Mara Memorial Lecture Award presented at NAVC.

Her fur/feather/fin family consists of 4 cats, 2 domestic geese, 14 chickens and a pond full of goldfish.

It can be challenging to find nutraceuticals that do what their manufacturers say they do — here’s what’s behind the hype of probiotics and prebiotics.

Winter 2019, Nutrition

Key Nutritional Factors in Treating Pancreatitis

Kara M. Burns MS, MEd, LVT, VTS (Nutrition), VTS-H (Internal Medicine, Dentistry), Editor in Chief

Kara Burns is an LVT with master’s degrees in physiology and counseling psychology. She began her career in human medicine working as an emergency psychologist and a poison specialist for humans and animals. Kara is the founder and president of the Academy of Veterinary Nutrition Technicians and has attained her VTS (Nutrition). She is the editor in chief of Today’s Veterinary Nurse. She also works as an independent nutritional consultant, and is the immediate past president of NAVTA. She has authored many articles, textbooks, and textbook chapters and is an internationally invited speaker, focusing on topics of nutrition, leadership, and technician utilization.

Rachel Poulin RVT, VTS (SAIM)

Rachel graduated from Columbus State Community College’s Veterinary Technician Program in 2007. After completing internships at the Ohio State University, she became specialized in internal medicine. In 2016, Rachel served as president of the Academy of Internal Medicine Veterinary Technicians. She became director of operations for Amerivet in 2017. Rachel is passionate about elevating the role of the veterinary nurse in the industry.

Gastrointestinal (GI) problems are one of the leading causes for which pets present to veterinary hospitals. When managing a patient nutritionally, the health care team should be knowledgeable of key nutritional factors and their impact.

Fall 2018, Nutrition

Feeding the Critical Canine and Feline Patient

Ed Carlson CVT, VTS (Nutrition)

Ed is the director of technician learning and development for Ethos Veterinary Health and VetBloom. He is also the 2020 president of the Massachusetts Veterinary Technician Association and the treasurer of the New Hampshire Veterinary Technician Association. Ed has served on multiple NAVTA committees and is the 2020 NAVTA president-elect. He obtained his VTS (Nutrition) in 2014 and lectures frequently at local, regional, and national veterinary conferences on a variety of nutrition topics. Ed was also the recipient of the NAVTA 2019 Technician of the Year award.

Nutrition is vitally important to the hospitalized patient. Unfortunately, the nutritional needs of hospitalized patients are often overlooked. Doctors’ orders might not include specific feeding instructions. Patients may be unwilling or unable to eat or may not be consuming adequate calories to meet their energy requirements. Whatever the reason, as patient advocates, veterinary nurses should …

Summer 2018, Nutrition

Starting Strong: Puppy and Kitten Nutrition

Victoria L. Kerby LVT, VTS (SAIM, Nutrition) BluePearl Veterinary Partners, Southfield, Michigan

Victoria (Tori) is a 2007 graduate of Bel Rea Institute, Denver CO with an Associates in Applied Animal Science.

She has worked at BluePearl Veterinary Partners with in the Internal Medicine Department, as a primary technician since 2007.

Tori obtained her first veterinary technical specialty in Small Animal Internal Medicine in 2011, her second in Nutrition in 2017. She is also board member for the Academy of Internal
Medicine Veterinary Technicians, as Small Animal Director at Large.

Clinical interest include clinical nutrition and its use in disease management and prevention, feline hyperthyroidism, and acid base disorders.

The average puppy or kitten enters its new home between 7 and 9 weeks of age. During the subsequent months, the veterinary team must impart a strong nutritional foundation to help to support the growth and development of the patient throughout this demanding period.

Featured, Spring 2018, Nutrition

Giant Expectations: Nutrition for the Large-Breed Puppy

Victoria L. Kerby LVT, VTS (SAIM, Nutrition) BluePearl Veterinary Partners, Southfield, Michigan

Victoria (Tori) is a 2007 graduate of Bel Rea Institute, Denver CO with an Associates in Applied Animal Science.

She has worked at BluePearl Veterinary Partners with in the Internal Medicine Department, as a primary technician since 2007.

Tori obtained her first veterinary technical specialty in Small Animal Internal Medicine in 2011, her second in Nutrition in 2017. She is also board member for the Academy of Internal
Medicine Veterinary Technicians, as Small Animal Director at Large.

Clinical interest include clinical nutrition and its use in disease management and prevention, feline hyperthyroidism, and acid base disorders.

Diet selection and growth rate management are equally critical in preventing developmental orthopedic disease in growing large-breed dogs.

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