Sep/Oct 2016

Stuck. Many of us can relate to feeling stuck when we continuously repeat old processes, live in unhappy relationships, or work in unhealthy environments. We may know that we are unhappy but often stay the course because we don’t know how to make successful change happen. We become comfortable with the familiar misery.
Sep/Oct 2016, Personal Wellbeing

Getting Your Life Unstuck

Deborah A. Stone MBA, PhD, CVPM | StoneVPN | Austin, Texas

Deborah has been involved with the veterinary profession for nearly 30 years and has experience in specialty, emergency, and general practice management.

She earned an MBA with a concentration in business management and completed her PhD in Organizational Leadership. Deborah is a Certified Veterinary Practice Manager, accredited from the Veterinary Hospital Managers Association. She devotes much of her time to community service activities and holds memberships with several veterinary-related associations and organizations.

Deborah is a national speaker, founder of Austin City Unlimited Veterinary Management Symposium, and published author of practice management/professional development articles. She enjoys spending time with her family as well as performing with her bands, the LaxaTones and the No-Lo Prophets.

Have you ever felt that you were in a rut? Trapped? Frozen? Maybe you feel that way now about some part of your life. Read this article for an introduction to the 4 steps to getting “unstuck.”

Laboratory tests are invaluable medical tools…if the results are reliable. Aside from sample collection and handling, many other factors can affect test outcomes, from patient stress to client misunderstanding. This article addresses the seemingly unimportant details that can have significant effects.
Sep/Oct 2016, Clinical Pathology

The Non-pathologic, Non-collection, and Non-sample Preanalytical Small “Stuff” That Influences Reliable Laboratory Results

Daniel J. Walsh MPS, LVT, RVT, VTS (Clinical Pathology) | Academy of Veterinary Clinical Pathology Technicians | West Lafayette, Indiana

Dan’s veterinary career began when he worked in a small animal practice during college. Upon graduation, he served in the Army as a Veterinary Care Specialist and had the privilege of caring for the Army mascot mules for a time. After discharge, he worked in mixed animal practice. Dan subsequently taught in the veterinary technology programs at SUNY Delhi for 28 years and Purdue University for over 11 years.

Dan holds an associate degree in veterinary technology; associate, bachelor’s, and master’s degrees in animal science; and a graduate certificate in veterinary homeland security. He is a member of several associations, including NAVTA and the Uniformed Veterinary Medical Association.

Laboratory tests are invaluable medical tools…if the results are reliable. Aside from sample collection and handling, many other factors can affect test outcomes, from patient stress to client misunderstanding. This article addresses the seemingly unimportant details that can have significant effects.

Toxicology Talk is written and reviewed by members of the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) Animal Poison Control Center (APCC). The mission of the APCC is to help animals exposed to potentially hazardous substances, which it does by providing 24-hour veterinary and diagnostic treatment recommendations from specially trained veterinary toxicologists. It also protects and improves animal lives by providing clinical toxicology training to veterinary toxicology residents, consulting services, and case data review.
Sep/Oct 2016, Toxicology

Top 10 Toxins That Are Rarely Serious

Jennifer A. Schuett CVT | ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, Urbana, Illinois

Jennifer worked in a small animal practice for 6 years before considering toxicology. She went to Joliet Junior College for her associate’s degree in veterinary medical technology, graduated in May 2010, and became a certified veterinary technician by August 2010. She has been with the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center for a little over 5 years. Jennifer has written several protocols for her workplace and articles for an online veterinary magazine, as well as being an active board moderator on the Veterinary Support Personnel Network (VSPN).

In her spare time, Jennifer likes to garden, craft, and spend time with friends and family. When Halloween season comes around, she is also an actor/makeup artist for a local haunted house. Jennifer and her husband Tom celebrated their first wedding anniversary in June 2016.

Read this article for some very common “toxic” exposures that may sound serious but rarely cause any significant clinical signs. Some recommendations for treatment—if needed—are included.

Becoming a “Cat-Friendly” Practice
Sep/Oct 2016, Practice Management

Becoming a “Cat-Friendly” Practice

Esther Klok Dierenkliniek Winsum | The Netherlands

Esther Klok, a veterinary technician at Dierenkliniek Winsum in the Netherlands, previously described her passion for bringing new ideas from the NAVC Conference home to her clinic in 3 articles in 2016 (available on TodaysVeterinaryTechnician.com). In this article, she outlines how her clinic designed a program that not only helps dogs with noise anxiety, but also improves the human–animal bond and has even increased community awareness of how noises affect animals.

Even though I am a dog and horse lover, I admit that becoming a cat-friendly practice is one of the best changes my clinic has made in the 22 years I have worked there.

When you believe that the circumstances in your life cause your feelings, you are left feeling powerless. Some people react by trying to manipulate everyone and everything around them in an attempt to feel better. Good luck with that. We can’t control others. Clients are going to behave badly, coworkers will aggravate us some days, we may have supervisors who have no business leading, and other people in our lives will continue to do things that aggravate and inconvenience us. But we get to decide what to think about all of those situations. And in turn, we get to decide how we are going to feel.
Sep/Oct 2016, Personal Wellbeing

The Golden Ticket to Feeling Better

Julie Squires Rekindle, LLC

Julie is a compassion fatigue specialist who brings a unique perspective and approach to support the sustained energy and passion of animal workers. Her company, Rekindle LLC, offers on-site compassion fatigue training to veterinary hospitals, animal shelters, and other animal organizations.

Julie has more than 20 years of experience within the veterinary field and with leading organizations. She has developed and executed training, workshops, and 1:1 coaching for major companies in the animal health industry. She obtained her certification as a compassion fatigue specialist through the Green Cross Academy of Traumatology and has also completed training from The Figley Institute and Traumatology Institute. Julie’s clients also gain from her experience as a certified health and wellness coach and corporate wellness specialist.

When you believe that the circumstances in your life cause your feelings, you are left feeling powerless. The truth is that you do have power—the power to make yourself feel better.

The Definition of Home
Sep/Oct 2016, Personal Wellbeing

The Definition of “Home”

Lynne Johnson-Harris LVT, RVT | Editor in Chief

Ms. Johnson-Harris has been involved with the NAVC as a speaker and moderator since 1990. She was the first veterinary technician to serve as an elected Board member of the NAVC serving the Board from 2003 to 2015. Ms Johnson-Harris was also the first veterinary technician to serve as the President of the NAVC (2013-2014). Along with being the Editor in Chief of Today’s Veterinary Nurse journal, Ms. Johnson-Harris is the NAVC Specialty Programs manager and works as the practice manager working along side her husband, Dr. Jerry Harris at Hinckley Animal Hospital.

Home is a feeling. It may be a feeling that you associate with where you grew up, or where your children grew up. It may be a friend’s house, or a favorite vacation spot. If you are lucky, it’s where you are right now.

This article from the British journal Feline Focus describes one clinic’s experience in—and benefits from—making the effort to become “feline friendly.”
Sep/Oct 2016, Practice Management

How Being Cat Friendly Has Made a Difference in Our Practice

Sarah Dawson RVN | Walton Vale Vets4Pets, Liverpool, UK

Sarah Dawson started work in veterinary practice in 2005 and at present is the Head Nurse and Cat Advocate for Walton Vale Vets4Pets in Liverpool, UK. She recently completed the ISFM Certificate in Feline Friendly Nursing with Distinction. Sarah was integral in implementing the Cat Friendly Clinic scheme in her practice, which was awarded silver, and she is working hard to change this to gold.

This article from the British journal Feline Focus describes one clinic’s experience in—and benefits from—making the effort to become “feline friendly.”

The field of shelter medicine has made enormous strides since the first shelter medicine residency was established at UC Davis in 2000. Get an inside look at the people who started the program and how they did it.
Sep/Oct 2016, Ethics/Welfare

15 Years: A Brief History of Shelter Medicine

Michael Bannasch BS, RVT | UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine

Michael began his career in high school working as an animal care attendant, groomer, and veterinary assistant at a family-owned veterinary practice in the suburbs of Detroit, Michigan. He spent nearly a decade working at the Virginia–Maryland Veterinary Emergency Service and over a year at the National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. In 1998, Michael moved to California to accept a position in UC Davis’s Small Animal Intensive Care Unit. He joined Dr. Niels Pedersen’s lab 2 years later, and shortly after that he became program coordinator of the first shelter medicine veterinary training program in the world. After 15 years in that position, Michael joined the UC Davis Veterinary Center for Clinical Trials.

The field of shelter medicine has made enormous strides since the first shelter medicine residency was established at UC Davis in 2000. Get an inside look at the people who started the program and how they did it.

Canine parvovirus is a longstanding nemesis of veterinary professionals. Learn why enteral feeding benefits patients with this common disease and how to measure, place, and use nasoesophageal and nasogastric tubes.
Sep/Oct 2016, Nutrition

How and Why to Feed Canine Parvovirus Patients Right Away

Kenichiro Yagi MS, RVT, VTS (ECC, SAIM)

Ken has spent nearly 20 years in practice. He obtained his VTS certification in emergency and critical care, as well as small animal internal medicine, and earned his master’s degree in Veterinary Science. He served as ICU Manager and Blood Bank Manager at Adobe Animal Hospital until 2018, and is now Program Director for the RECOVER CPR Initiative and simulation lab manager of the Park Veterinary Innovation Laboratory at Cornell University. He co-chairs the Veterinary Nurse Initiative and serves as a board member of the Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society, the Academy of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Technicians, and the Veterinary Innovation Council.

Canine parvovirus is a longstanding nemesis of veterinary professionals. Learn why enteral feeding benefits patients with this common disease and how to measure, place, and use nasoesophageal and nasogastric tubes.

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