Winter 2020

Winter 2020

To read the digital issue, click here.

Articles

Andrew Lyons Winter 2020
Winter 2020, Practice Management

Substance Abuse in the Workplace: What to Do?

Mary L. Berg BS, RVT, RLATG, VTS (Dentistry)

Mary received her B.S. in Biology/Microbiology from South Dakota State University, A.S. in Laboratory Animal Science, and A.S. in Veterinary Technology from St. Petersburg College. She is a Charter member of the Academy of Veterinary Dental Technicians and received her VTS in Dentistry in June 2006. She serves as treasurer of the AVDT, president-elect of the KVTA, and Chair of the District Representative Committee for NAVTA. Mary has been published in various professional publications, and is a speaker/lab instructor at international, national, and state conferences. Mary and her husband have 2 sons and 3 grandchildren and live on a small farm near Lawrence, KS.

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Substance abuse in veterinary medicine has become a widespread problem and has repercussions in the abuser’s personal and professional life, as well as staff, patients, and clients in the workplace.

Winter 2020, Personal/Professional Development

Critical Thinking in Veterinary Trauma Care

Megan Brashear BS, RVT, VTS (ECC)

Megan graduated in 2000 with a BS degree in Veterinary Technology. She has enjoyed working in emergency and critical care since 2000 and is currently the Small Animal Veterinary Nursing Manager at the Purdue University Veterinary Teaching Hospital in West Lafayette, Indiana, where she oversees the technician supervisors as well as teaches and trains technicians and students on the hospital floor. She loves the opportunity to travel and lecture, sharing her knowledge with veterinary nurses and technicians around the world.

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Trauma is a common event in veterinary hospitals and can result from a number of sources. Not every trauma patient is the same and the veterinary nursing team must be ready to anticipate patient changes and treatment orders. This quick and accurate response requires critical thinking skills.

Featured, Winter 2020, Personal/Professional Development

The Art of Teaching in Higher Education

Alysha McDaniel CVT

Alysha obtained her veterinary technician degree from San Juan College in 2014. She started working in emergency medicine at the University of Illinois in 2015 and quickly found her love for teaching. Now she works at the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine in the Clinical Skills Learning Center as a clinical instructor to veterinary students. Alysha enjoys speaking at conferences in central Illinois and lecturing to student organizations. She is currently completing her bachelor’s degree with plans to pursue a master’s degree in education.

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Veterinary medicine has evolved so vastly in recent years that veterinary nurses have many potential career paths available. One path many people in our field don’t realize veterinary nurses can take is teaching and writing curriculum, specifically in a college or university setting. This path greatly utilizes the skills and knowledge that veterinary nurses spend years perfecting and is also very rewarding.

Winter 2020, Ophthalmology

Sudden Acquired Retinal Degeneration Syndrome: An Overview

Pam Kirby RVT, VTS (Ophthalmology)

Pam graduated from Purdue University’s veterinary technology program in 1997. She has been employed at Purdue University ever since, first in the small animal intensive care unit and then in the veterinary ophthalmology department. Pam’s special interests include large animal ophthalmology, ocular imaging, and surgery. She also enjoys teaching veterinary and veterinary nursing students on the clinic floor, in the classroom, in labs, and online. Pam has served on the executive board of the Veterinary Ophthalmic Technician Society as vice president and unseated board member. She is a charter member and current secretary of the Academy of Veterinary Ophthalmic Technicians. She enjoys continuing to learn as much as she can about veterinary ophthalmic nursing.

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Sudden acquired retinal degeneration syndrome (SARDS) is a permanently blinding disease that occurs suddenly. It is one of the leading causes of incurable canine vision loss diagnosed by veterinary ophthalmologists.

Winter 2020, Emergency Medicine/Critical Care

Supportive Feeding Methods for Small Animals

Nicola Ackerman PGCert, RVN, CertSAN, CertVNECC, VTS (Nutrition)

Nicola has worked in the veterinary profession since 1994 and is currently the Head Medical Nurse at Plymouth Veterinary Group. She has written for many veterinary publications and textbooks and is the editor of Aspinall’s Complete Textbook of Veterinary Nursing. Nicola won the British Veterinary Nursing Association (BVNA)/Blue Cross award for animal welfare in 2010, and she was designated the SQP Veterinary Nurse of the Year in 2011 and the SQP Nutritional Advisor of the Year (2013). In 2012, Nicola was given the CAW Professional Development Award for outstanding service to the veterinary nursing profession. She is studying for a master’s degree in Advanced Veterinary Nursing from Glasgow University.

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

The nutritional goal with all sick companion animals is that they consume the designated diet in sufficient quantities. Many patients may require, or benefit from, a veterinary therapeutic diet, but your initial goal is to ensure that the patient is receiving its daily caloric requirement from a nutritionally balanced diet.

Winter 2020, Ophthalmology

An ECG Through the Eye?

Holly Kitchen CVT, VTS (Ophthalmology)

Holly practices in the Ophthalmology Service at the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine. In 2005, Holly graduated from Wells College with a BS in Biochemistry and Microbiology. She earned her CVT in 2013, and her VTS from the Academy of Veterinary Ophthalmic Technicians in 2017. She and 8 other members became the first VTS technicians in the field of veterinary ophthalmology. Holly lectures annually at her institution’s Technician Continuing Education Conference and has presented at the Ophthalmology Technician Continuing Education Conference. Her passions include helping educate future veterinarians, veterinary ophthalmologists and veterinary nurses, and advocating for her patients.

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

This case report describes an abnormal electroretinogram (ERG) obtained from a patient with a pacemaker and a diagnosis of sudden acquired retinal degeneration syndrome (SARDS). SARDS is one of the most frustrating ocular diseases seen in veterinary medicine.

Continuing Education, Featured, Winter 2020, Dentistry

Multimodal Analgesia for Periodontal Therapy

Tasha McNerney BS, CVT, CVPP, VTS (Anesthesia)

Tasha became a VTS in anesthesia in 2015 and is a certified Veterinary Pain Practitioner who works closely with the IVAPM to educate the public about animal pain awareness. She loves to lecture on various anesthesia and pain management topics around the globe. In her spare time, Tasha enjoys reading and spending time with her son.

Kara M. Burns MS, MEd, LVT, VTS (Nutrition), VTS-H (Internal Medicine, Dentistry), Editor in Chief, Director of Veterinary Nursing

Kara Burns is an LVT with master’s degrees in physiology and counseling psychology. She began her career in human medicine working as an emergency psychologist and a poison specialist for humans and animals. Kara is the founder and president of the Academy of Veterinary Nutrition Technicians and has attained her VTS (Nutrition). She is the director of veterinary nursing for the NAVC as well as the editor in chief of Today’s Veterinary Nurse. She also works as an independent nutritional consultant, and is the immediate past president of NAVTA. She has authored many articles, textbooks, and textbook chapters and is an internationally invited speaker, focusing on topics of nutrition, leadership, and technician utilization.

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Treatment of periodontal disease in all patients is prudent, and the use of analgesia, including general anesthesia, is essential to the comprehensive treatment plan.

Featured, Winter 2020, Oncology

Working to Cure Cancer in Animals

Don Vaughan

Donald Vaughan is a freelance writer based in Raleigh, North Carolina. His work has appeared in Writer’s Digest, Boys’ Life, Military Officer Magazine, Today’s Veterinary Business, and numerous other publications. He is also the founder of Triangle Association of Freelancers.

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Veterinary oncology research strives to advance the diagnosis and treatment of cancer in dogs, cats, and other species. Across the nation, veterinary schools and other institutions are conducting clinical studies on a variety of cancers, many of which hold promise for both animals and humans.

Winter 2020, Orthopedics

Osteoarthritis: When Age Is Not to Blame

Emi Kate Saito VMD, MSPH, MBA, DACVPM (Epidemiology)

Dr. Saito is a member of the Veterinary Affairs team at Banfield Pet Hospital’s headquarters in Vancouver, Wash. As senior manager of Veterinary Research Programs, Dr. Saito leverages Banfield’s electronic medical records to understand pet health trends and to improve patient outcomes by supporting Banfield’s Medical Quality program. She is an alumnus of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the University of Pennsylvania, Emory University, and the University of Colorado. Her broad career history includes laboratory research, small animal practice, and animal health surveillance.

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

As veterinary professionals, we know all too well that the signs of osteoarthritis (OA) can be missed or misinterpreted by pet owners. Many times, the subtler clinical signs associated with osteoarthritis are thought to be normal age-related changes. Because this leads to underdiagnosis of OA, we focused Banfield Pet Hospital’s 2019 State of Pet Health® Report on osteoarthritis, including how the condition is linked to excess weight.

Winter 2020, Dentistry

Dentistry Education for Patients and Practices

Mary L. Berg BS, RVT, RLATG, VTS (Dentistry)

Mary received her B.S. in Biology/Microbiology from South Dakota State University, A.S. in Laboratory Animal Science, and A.S. in Veterinary Technology from St. Petersburg College. She is a Charter member of the Academy of Veterinary Dental Technicians and received her VTS in Dentistry in June 2006. She serves as treasurer of the AVDT, president-elect of the KVTA, and Chair of the District Representative Committee for NAVTA. Mary has been published in various professional publications, and is a speaker/lab instructor at international, national, and state conferences. Mary and her husband have 2 sons and 3 grandchildren and live on a small farm near Lawrence, KS.

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Oral disease is one of the most prevalent diseases in dogs and cats, yet 80% of companion animals do not receive dental care at the veterinary hospital. Read more on how to incorporate dental care inside and out of the hospital.

NAVTA Corner
Winter 2020, Practice Management

A Focus on Utilization

Kenichiro Yagi MS, RVT, VTS (ECC, SAIM)

Ken has spent nearly 20 years in practice. He obtained his VTS certification in emergency and critical care, as well as small animal internal medicine, and earned his master’s degree in Veterinary Science. He served as ICU Manager and Blood Bank Manager at Adobe Animal Hospital until 2018, and is now Program Director for the RECOVER CPR Initiative and simulation lab manager of the Park Veterinary Innovation Laboratory at Cornell University. He co-chairs the Veterinary Nurse Initiative and serves as a board member of the Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society, the Academy of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Technicians, and the Veterinary Innovation Council.

Heather Prendergast RVT, CVPM

Heather has spent over 25 years in small animal practice, teaches veterinary technology and assistance programs, and is the author of Front Office Management for the Veterinary Team. She lectures on topics ranging from grief management for health care professionals to nutrition, inventory, communications, and veterinary team management. She has also written several articles and participated in published roundtable discussions on these topics.

Currently, Heather provides consulting services for veterinary hospitals and is an instructor for Patterson Veterinary University and VetMedTeam. She serves on several advisory committees and is the Program Chair of the Technician Program at the North American Veterinary Conference. Heather was named the 2014 Veterinary Technician of the Year and Continuing Educator of the Year for 2016 at the Western Veterinary Conference.

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

There has been a significant amount of focus on veterinary technician utilization—or rather, underutilization—as an issue within our profession.

Winter 2020, Nutrition

Grain-Free Diets and Dilated Cardiomyopathy

Kara M. Burns MS, MEd, LVT, VTS (Nutrition), VTS-H (Internal Medicine, Dentistry), Editor in Chief, Director of Veterinary Nursing

Kara Burns is an LVT with master’s degrees in physiology and counseling psychology. She began her career in human medicine working as an emergency psychologist and a poison specialist for humans and animals. Kara is the founder and president of the Academy of Veterinary Nutrition Technicians and has attained her VTS (Nutrition). She is the director of veterinary nursing for the NAVC as well as the editor in chief of Today’s Veterinary Nurse. She also works as an independent nutritional consultant, and is the immediate past president of NAVTA. She has authored many articles, textbooks, and textbook chapters and is an internationally invited speaker, focusing on topics of nutrition, leadership, and technician utilization.

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

As niche pet food markets continue to grow, veterinarians are worried they could cause more problems than they could help.

Winter 2020, Personal/Professional Development

The Magic of New Beginnings

Kara M. Burns MS, MEd, LVT, VTS (Nutrition), VTS-H (Internal Medicine, Dentistry), Editor in Chief, Director of Veterinary Nursing

Kara Burns is an LVT with master’s degrees in physiology and counseling psychology. She began her career in human medicine working as an emergency psychologist and a poison specialist for humans and animals. Kara is the founder and president of the Academy of Veterinary Nutrition Technicians and has attained her VTS (Nutrition). She is the director of veterinary nursing for the NAVC as well as the editor in chief of Today’s Veterinary Nurse. She also works as an independent nutritional consultant, and is the immediate past president of NAVTA. She has authored many articles, textbooks, and textbook chapters and is an internationally invited speaker, focusing on topics of nutrition, leadership, and technician utilization.

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Self-reflection can provide lessons, insights, and clarity for the future. As you begin 2020, take time to reflect on the prior year. Was it everything you expected? What challenges are you facing? Are you satisfied and fulfilled in your professional journey? Or do you want a change?

DMCA.com Protection Status
MENU