September/October 2017

September/October 2017

Today’s Veterinary Nurse supports your clinical skills, professional development, and career growth.
Digital Edition

CE Articles

Proud To Be a Vet Tech

We all know that a normal day for any veterinary technician is always crazy. We run all over the place and fly around the clinic. We have so many “jobs.” We are a nurse, an operation assistant, a cleaning woman, a front-desk superstar, a radiographer, a grunt worker, and an anesthetist.

Letter to Editor, Feline Heartworm Disease: Fact or Fiction

Feline Heartworm Disease: Fact or Fiction

Matthew Krecic, DVM, MS, MBA, DACVIM (SAIM) and Adrienne Abel, CVT In the May/June 2017 issue of Today’s Veterinary Nurse, we were pleased to come across the article “Feline Heartworm Disease: Fact or Fiction” by Ms. Ann Wortinger and agree that feline heartworm disease is indeed fact.1–3 We likewise agree that confirming heartworm disease in …

What’s Your Happy Place?

What’s Your Happy Place?

Lynne Johnson-Harris RVT | Editor in Chief

Ms. Johnson-Harris has been involved with the NAVC as a speaker and moderator since 1990. She was the first veterinary technician to serve as an elected Board member of the NAVC serving the Board from 2003 to 2015. Ms Johnson-Harris was also the first veterinary technician to serve as the President of the NAVC (2013-2014). Along with being the Editor in Chief of Today’s Veterinary Nurse journal, Ms. Johnson-Harris is the NAVC Specialty Programs manager and works as the practice manager working along side her husband, Dr. Jerry Harris at Hinckley Animal Hospital.

Visiting your “happy place” is a vital tool for dealing with workplace stress, especially in the veterinary field. What is yours?

Ann Wortinger, BIS, LVT, VTS (ECC, SAIM, Nutrition) It is obvious from my string of initials that I love to learn. For each of my specialty certifications, I am required to do 60 hours of continuing education (CE) every 5 years or, on average, 12 hours every year. That is 36 hours per year just for my specialty certifications. In 2019, that number will go up when I renew my license under Michigan’s new CE requirements.

Education!

Ann Wortinger BIS, LVT, VTS (ECC, SAIM, Nutrition) | Belleville, Michigan

Ann is a 1983 graduate of Michigan State University. She has worked in general, emergency, and specialty practice, as well as education and management.

Ann is active in her state, national, and specialty organizations and served on the organizing committees for the internal medicine and nutrition veterinary technician specialties. She has mentored over 15 fellow veterinary technician specialists.

She has published over 45 articles in professional magazines, as well as book chapters, and is a coauthor of Nutrition and Disease Management for Veterinary Technicians and Nurses, now in its second edition.

Find out how Ann Wortinger, BIS, LVT, VTS (ECC, SAIM, Nutrition) uses education to open new doors and stay on the cutting edge in the veterinary field.

Show What You’ve Got! Lessons in Public Relations

Show What You’ve Got! Lessons in Public Relations

Esther Klok Dierenkliniek Winsum | The Netherlands

Esther Klok has 24 years of experience as a veterinary technician. She works in a mixed practice that handles both small animals and horses. Most of the time she can be found working in the back, but she also enjoys the front desk and has convinced her boss she really needs to be there one day a week. She has also just started her own company, Improve on the Move. She loves giving lectures, teaching, organizing conventions, and writing and providing photos for magazines. And, because she obviously needs to do something with any leftover time, Esther and her boyfriend travel throughout Europe to compete for the Dutch team in single horse carriage driving.

Veterinary practices may not need to look far for assistance in public relations and marketing. Esther Klok believes veterinary technicians can play a big role in these areas.

A Personal Journey to Mindfulness

A Personal Journey to Mindfulness

Kim Pope-Robinson DVM, CCFP | 1 Life Connected Consulting

Dr. Pope has been in veterinary medicine for more than 20 years, practicing in both the large and small animal sectors. In addition, she supported the position of a multi-unit manager for a large corporate practice and spent time in the pharmaceutical sector working with specialists and universities. Her career has provided her a unique understanding of the stresses involved with maintaining a career in this industry, and she now dedicates her time to providing wellbeing support for the profession. She provides this support through 1-on-1 coaching, through customized team events, and as a dynamic speaker. She is also the author of The Unspoken Life, which explores the concepts of Recognize, Embrace, Connect in more detail. In the end, Dr. Pope truly believes that we are all 1 Life Connected.

Mindfulness is a unique concept to every individual. Kim Pope-Robinson, DVM, CCFP, has introduced a framework to help others find their own sustainable path within veterinary medicine.

Dermal, Ocular, and Inhalation Decontamination in Dogs and Cats

Dermal, Ocular, and Inhalation Decontamination in Dogs and Cats

Erin Freed CVT | ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center

Erin has been employed with the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (APCC) since 2006. She earned her associate’s degree in applied science in veterinary technology from Parkland Community College and is currently pursuing a bachelor’s degree in applied science in veterinary business management from St. Petersburg College. Erin’s interests include toxicology, but her true passion is sharing knowledge and educating veterinary staff. She has been an instructor for a toxicology continuing education (CE) course for the Veterinary Support Personnel Network and has spoken at several APCC CE conferences. Erin has had peer-reviewed articles published in Veterinary Technician, the NAVTA Journal, and Veterinary Medicine and has authored a chapter on the renal system in Small Animal Toxicology Essentials.

Erin Freed, CVT, BAS, offers her insight into effective methods of decontamination in dogs and cats.

How Can We Address Antimicrobial Resistance Head On?

How Can We Address Antimicrobial Resistance Head On?

Rachel Beck CVT, PMP | Banfield Pet Hospital, Portland, Oregon

Rachel Beck is a certified veterinary technician and credentialed project manager on the Veterinary Medical Programs team at Banfield Pet Hospital. She currently leads a team of project managers who specialize in implementation. Having been in the veterinary field for over 15 years, she has served roles both in hospitals and at Banfield’s central office. She is passionate about engaging the whole veterinary team in proactive health and wellness as well as about career pathing for paraprofessionals in the industry. She resides in Portland, Oregon, with her significant other and 2 cats.

Rachel Beck, CVT, PMP, explains how to take on antimicrobial resistance in a veterinary clinic by applying key concepts of quality improvement.

Clinical Pathology, MDR1, Genetics, MDR1 Mutation,

MDR1 Genetic Testing: What You Need to Know

Rebecca Connors LVT | Washington State University

Rebecca has been employed at the Veterinary Clinical Pharmacology Laboratory at Washington State University since 2011. After graduation from the Michigan State University Veterinary Technology Program, she worked in several small- and mixed-animal veterinary practices in Michigan and Arizona. In 1996 she became the neurology technician at Washington State University’s Veterinary Teaching Hospital, followed by a 6-year stretch as a cardiology technician for Ohio State University’s Veterinary Medical Center. In 2008 she returned to Washington State University to work in veterinary genetics and Holter interpretation. She lives in Idaho with her husband, 2 sons, and a variety of dogs and cats.

Hidden in the genetic code of many herding-breed dogs is a mutation that increases their susceptibility to drug toxicosis. It is important for veterinary technicians to recognize which dogs are at risk and which drugs to avoid or administer with a reduced dose.

This article provides an overview of canine high-grade multicentric lymphoma and its classification, diagnosis, and treatment.

Canine Multicentric Lymphoma: An Overview

Kriste Sears-Sein RVT, VTS (Oncology) | University of California, Davis

Kriste has been working in the veterinary field in and around Sacramento, California, since 1997. After receiving her RVT in 1999, she began working in emergency and holistic medicine, which sparked her interest in the human–animal bond and quality-of-life focus in veterinary medicine. In 2008 she received her veterinary technician specialist certification in oncology, and since then has lectured around the United States on various topics related to cancer and compassionate care. She has been working as the Medical Oncology Supervisor at the University of California, Davis, since 2010.

This article provides an overview of canine high-grade multicentric lymphoma and its classification, diagnosis, and treatment.

Behavior concerns are the number-one cause for pet relinquishment. Through preventive behavior services, veterinary technicians can help preserve the human–animal bond.

Technician-Driven Preventive Behavior Services

Debbie Martin LVT, VTS (Behavior), Veterinary Behavior Consultations, LLC, Austin, TX

Debbie has been a full-time registered/licensed veterinary technician since 1996 and worked in private practice for more than 14 years. Since 2005, she has been the animal behavior technician for Veterinary Behavior Consultations, LLC. She assists Kenneth Martin, DVM, DACVB, during behavior consultations. Debbie is also a co-owner of TEAM Education in Animal Behavior, LLC. She is a contributing author and coeditor of the textbook Canine and Feline Behavior for Veterinary Technicians and Nurses. She is also a coauthor of the book Puppy Start Right: Foundation Training for the Companion Dog and the Karen Pryor Academy course “Puppy Start Right for Instructors.” She is honored to be representing veterinary technicians on the Fear Free executive council.

Behavior concerns are the number-one cause for pet relinquishment. Through preventive behavior services, veterinary technicians can help preserve the human–animal bond.

With adequate preparation and understanding of the unique physiologic and anatomic differences involved, anesthetists can provide excellent care for pediatric patients. This article highlights these aspects of anesthesia in pediatric patients.

Anesthesia for Pediatric Patients

Trish Farry CVN, AVN, VTS (ECC, Anesthesia & Analgesia), TAA GCHEd | School of Veterinary Science at The University of Queensland, Australia

Trish Farry is an Australian certified nurse with specialist qualifications in emergency and critical care and anesthesia. She is an associate lecturer and clinical instructor in anesthesia within the School of Veterinary Science at The University of Queensland in Australia and co-coordinates the final year of BAppSci (Veterinary Technology) program. Her areas of teaching include emergency medicine, anesthesia, analgesia, and clinical practices for undergraduate veterinary and veterinary technology students.

Wendy Goodwin BVSc, PhD, FANZCVS (Veterinary Anaesthesia, Critical Care) | School of Veterinary Science at The University of Queensland, Australia

Wendy is a veterinarian with a PhD and specialist qualifications in veterinary anesthesia and critical care. She works at the School of Veterinary Science, University of Queensland, Australia, as a clinical anesthetist, lecturer, and researcher in the areas of anesthesia, analgesia, and critical care.

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With adequate preparation and understanding of the unique physiologic and anatomic differences involved, anesthetists can provide excellent care for pediatric patients. This article highlights these aspects of anesthesia in pediatric patients.

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