May/June 2017

May/June 2017

Today’s Veterinary Technician supports your clinical skills, professional development, and career growth.
Digital Edition

Articles

The Volunteer Spirit
May/June 2017, Personal/Professional Development

The Volunteer Spirit

Lynne Johnson-Harris LVT, RVT | Editor in Chief

Ms. Johnson-Harris has been involved with the NAVC as a speaker and moderator since 1990. She was the first veterinary technician to serve as an elected Board member of the NAVC serving the Board from 2003 to 2015. Ms Johnson-Harris was also the first veterinary technician to serve as the President of the NAVC (2013-2014). Along with being the Editor in Chief of Today’s Veterinary Nurse journal, Ms. Johnson-Harris is the NAVC Specialty Programs manager and works as the practice manager working along side her husband, Dr. Jerry Harris at Hinckley Animal Hospital.

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Volunteers are essential to the success of many projects, often working long, hard hours for the reward of community success. Do you have the volunteer spirit?

Dr. Earl H. Rippie Veterinary Technician Leadership Scholarship
May/June 2017,

Leaders, Step Forward

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NAVC’s Dr. Earl H. Rippie Veterinary Technician Leadership Scholarship honors the memory of Dr. Rippie, who was a champion of veterinary technicians and a leader in the veterinary industry. Submit your application and enter to win a scholarship to VMX 2018!

May/June 2017, Toxicology

Trazodone in Veterinary Medicine

Tamara Foss CVT | ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center | Urbana, Illinois

Tamara has been with the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center since 2000. She earned her bachelor’s degree in agriculture with an emphasis in animal health technology from Murray State University in Kentucky. Tamara especially enjoys the toxicology-, research-, and information technology–related aspects of her position at the ASPCA. She has a passion for greyhounds and is an active volunteer and foster for American Greyhound. Outside of work, she loves spending time with her greyhounds, especially helping her greyhound Callen have fun playing running games like lure coursing and straight racing.

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Trazodone is commonly prescribed in human medicine to treat various disorders, such as depression and anxiety, and is sometimes used in pets as well. Here’s what to do if an animal is accidentally exposed to toxic amounts of trazodone.

How Often Does Treatment Follow the Guidelines?
May/June 2017, Internal Medicine

How Often Does Treatment Follow the Guidelines?

Rachel Beck CVT, PMP

Rachel Beck is a certified veterinary technician and credentialed project manager on the Veterinary Medical Programs team at Banfield Pet Hospital. She currently leads a team of project managers who specialize in implementation. Having been in the veterinary field for over 15 years, she has served roles both in hospitals and at Banfield’s central office. She is passionate about engaging the whole veterinary team in proactive health and wellness as well as about career pathing for paraprofessionals in the industry. She resides in Portland, Oregon, with her significant other and 2 cats.

Nathaniel Spofford MPH | Banfield Pet Hospital, Portland, Oregon

Nate Spofford is a Senior Research Specialist on Banfield’s Applied Research & Knowledge (BARK) team. He received his Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Puget Sound and his Master of Public Health degree from Portland State University. Before joining Banfield, Nate worked in clinical, behavioral, and public health research at Oregon Health & Science University. Nate is dedicated to conducting population-based research to support the practice of evidence-based medicine. He currently lives in Portland, Oregon, with his wife Kenzin, daughter Madeleine, and cat Smallie.

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This new column explores the findings of the inaugural Banfield VET Report on antimicrobial usage in veterinary practice. This article gives an overview of how often antimicrobials are used as recommended for respiratory tract and urinary tract infections.

Less than 6% of dogs and cats that experience cardiopulmonary arrest survive to discharge. The veterinary team needs to be well trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and be ready to deliver it. Key aspects include preparedness and prevention, basic and advanced life support, monitoring, and postarrest care.
May/June 2017, Emergency Medicine/Critical Care

Critical Components to Successful CPR: The RECOVER Guidelines, Preparedness, and Team

Kenichiro Yagi MS, RVT, VTS (ECC, SAIM)

Ken has spent nearly 20 years in practice. He obtained his VTS certification in emergency and critical care, as well as small animal internal medicine, and earned his master’s degree in Veterinary Science. He served as ICU Manager and Blood Bank Manager at Adobe Animal Hospital until 2018, and is now Program Director for the RECOVER CPR Initiative and simulation lab manager of the Park Veterinary Innovation Laboratory at Cornell University. He co-chairs the Veterinary Nurse Initiative and serves as a board member of the Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society, the Academy of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Technicians, and the Veterinary Innovation Council.

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Less than 6% of dogs and cats that experience cardiopulmonary arrest survive to discharge. The veterinary team needs to be well trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and be ready to deliver it. Key aspects include preparedness and prevention, basic and advanced life support, monitoring, and post-arrest care.

The Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines a bully as a blustering, browbeating person; especially one who is habitually cruel, insulting, or threatening to others who are weaker, smaller, or in some way vulnerable.
May/June 2017, Practice Management

Bully Tactics

Julie Squires CCFS | Rekindle, LLC

Julie is a compassion fatigue specialist who brings a unique perspective and approach to support the sustained energy and passion of animal workers. Her company, Rekindle LLC, offers on-site compassion fatigue training to veterinary hospitals, animal shelters, lab animal research facilities, and other animal organizations.

Julie has 25 years of experience within the veterinary field and with leading organizations. She has developed and executed training, workshops, and 1:1 coaching for major companies in the animal health industry. She obtained her certification as a compassion fatigue specialist through the Traumatology Institute. Julie’s clients also gain from her experience as a certified life coach and corporate wellness specialist.

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Bullies like to feel powerful. But here’s the secret: they only have the power you give them. Learn how to take back control of your feelings when faced with a bully.

Doxorubicin is one of the most dangerous chemotherapeutics used in veterinary oncology. However, it is also one of the most common and efficacious treatments for several types of canine and feline cancer. This article provides an overview of doxorubicin’s uses and precautions to take when administering it.
May/June 2017, Oncology

Doxorubicin: An Overview

Emily Fullerton RVT, VTS (Oncology) | VCA Veterinary Referral Associates | Gaithersburg, Maryland

Emily obtained her associate’s degree from Vet Tech Institute in December 2008, leading her to her registered veterinary technician license in January 2009. She subsequently moved to Maryland, where she found her place in veterinary medicine: medical oncology. With her passion for helping animals and support from her coworkers, she achieved her Veterinary Technician Specialist certification in oncology in 2014. Emily has a love of  food and wine, her own fuzzy pets, and spending time with her family.

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Doxorubicin is one of the most dangerous chemotherapeutics used in veterinary oncology. However, it is also one of the most common and efficacious treatments for several types of canine and feline cancer. This article provides an overview of doxorubicin’s uses and precautions to take when administering it.

May/June 2017, Parasitology

Feline Heartworm Disease: Fact or Fiction?

Ann Wortinger BIS, LVT, VTS (ECC, SAIM, Nutrition)

Ann is a 1983 graduate of Michigan State University and got her specialty certification in Emergency/ Critical Care in 2000, in Small Animal Internal Medicine in 2008 and in Nutrition in 2013. In 2017 she attained her Fear Free Level on certification, and has since moved into level 2.

She has worked in general, emergency, specialty practice, education and management. Ann is active in her state, national and specialty organizations, and served on the organizing committees for Internal Medicine and Nutrition. She has mentored over 20 fellow VTSs and has worked on a variety of committees and positions. She is currently an instructor and Academic Advisor for Ashworth College’s Veterinary Technology Program, as well as an active speaker and writer.

Ann has over 50 published articles in various professional magazines as well as book chapters and a book, Nutrition and Disease Management for Veterinary Technicians and Nurses in its second edition in 2016 coauthored with Kara Burns. Ann received the 2009 Service Award for her state association (MAVT), the 2010 Achievement Award for the Academy of Internal Medicine for Veterinary Technicians (AIMVT), and in 2012 received the Jack L. Mara Memorial Lecture Award presented at NAVC.

Her fur/feather/fin family consists of 4 cats, 2 domestic geese, 14 chickens and a pond full of goldfish.

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In areas where dogs are exposed to mosquitoes that carry Dirofilaria immitis, so are cats. Feline heartworm disease differs from canine disease in many ways, making it important for veterinary technicians to be aware of the risks and clinical signs in cats.

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