Feature Articles

FeatureOncologyChemotherapy-Induced Side Effects: Prevention and Treatment

PREVENTING SIDE EFFECTS Prevention of chemotherapy-induced side effects begins with appropriate dosing. Administration of any drug, supplement, or treatment can result in side effects, or adverse events. Chemotherapy is no exception. Although the goal of chemotherapy in veterinary patients is to extend the life of the patient without the harsh side effects seen in human …

FeatureEquine MedicineGastric Ulcers in Performance Horses

PERFORMANCE STRESS Most performance horses develop ulcers. Having a dedicated healthcare team to care for these horses is essential to recovery. When considering gastrointestinal problems of horses, colic is probably the first thing that comes to mind. However, one of the most common problems affecting nearly all performance horses globally is gastric ulceration. Recent advances …

Feline Medicine Pandora Syndrome

LITTERBOX AVOIDANCE Consider Pandora syndrome as the diagnosis rather than feline idiopathic cystitis. Practicing Cat Friendly The articles presented by the American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) focus on feline-specific information on cats’ unique behaviors; diagnosis and evaluation of disease and conditions; better approaches and techniques for cats; and strategies to decrease stress associated with …

Internal Medicine Common Upper Airway Conditions

Dogs and cats with upper airway conditions are often seen in the clinic when their condition is acute. Many of these animals are in critical condition as the result of a chronic disease that has progressed to an acute stage. Chronic conditions that typically develop due to breed predispositions or infectious agents include laryngeal paralysis, …

Behavior Understanding the Cat

PRACTICING CAT FRIENDLY Welcome to a series of articles, presented in partnership between NAVC Publishing and American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP). These articles focus on feline-specific information on cats’ unique behaviors; diagnosis and evaluation of disease and conditions; better approaches and techniques for cats; and strategies to decrease stress associated with the veterinary visit …

Management Strategies Lead Toxicity: A Threat to Wildlife

LEVEL OF TOXICITY Animals can present with acute or chronic lead toxicity depending upon the amount and form ingested. Scenario: A fisherman finds a juvenile trumpeter swan (Cygnus buccinator) sitting quietly next to his favorite fishing hole. As he approaches the swan, he notices that she does not try to run or fly away. In …

Me-oww! Managing Chronic Feline Pain

Veterinary medicine has made great strides in the treatment of chronic pain in cats. The veterinary paradigm has shifted from questioning whether animals feel pain to recognizing and treating their pain.

Discospondylitis: An Overview

Discospondylitis is an infection of the vertebral endplates and associated intervertebral disk. The infection typically starts in the vertebral end plate, then spreads to the adjacent intervertebral disc. The blood supply within the vertebral endplates consists of capillary beds with reduced blood flow velocity. Pores in the end plate that normally allow for distribution of …

Equine Pythiosis: An Overview

Pythiosis is a noncontagious disease caused by Pythiosis insidiosum, a fungus-like, protozoan organism. Until recently, it was considered to be a threat only to horses living in tropical or subtropical environments; however, it has been seen in many other areas of the United States, such as Illinois, New York, and even Wisconsin.1 Although dogs, cats, …

Otitis Externa: Inflammation of the Ear Canal

Otitis externa is a common condition that is frequently seen in specialty dermatology clinics and small animal general practices.1,2 It is defined as inflammation of the ear canal with or without involvement of the pinna.1–3 Otitis is often considered a final diagnosis, but it is merely a clinical sign. The many factors that can contribute …

Clinical Pathology, MDR1, Genetics, MDR1 Mutation,

MDR1 Genetic Testing: What You Need to Know

Hidden in the genetic code of many herding-breed dogs is a mutation that increases their susceptibility to drug toxicosis. It is important for veterinary technicians to recognize which dogs are at risk and which drugs to avoid or administer with a reduced dose.

Canine Uveitis and the Veterinary Technician

Canine Uveitis and the Veterinary Technician

Uveitis can be not only a confusing and frustrating diagnosis for owners, but also a sign of underlying, potentially zoonotic disease. This article provides an overview of essential information for assisting clients and protecting the veterinary team.

Luxating Patellas: Pathology and Treatment Options

Luxating Patellas: Pathology and Treatment Options

Patellar luxation is one of the most common hindlimb orthopedic abnormalities seen in dogs. This article discusses the anatomy, diagnosis, management, and other aspects of patellar luxation with which veterinary technicians should be familiar.

Feline Heartworm Disease: Fact or Fiction?

In areas where dogs are exposed to mosquitoes that carry Dirofilaria immitis, so are cats. Feline heartworm disease differs from canine disease in many ways, making it important for veterinary technicians to be aware of the risks and clinical signs in cats.

Pain Management and Becoming a Patient Advocate

Information on pain management and assessment in veterinary patients has grown tremendously. This article provides an overview of common pharmaceuticals as well as advanced multimodal techniques to help veterinary technicians realize their role as patient advocates in minimizing pain.

Puppies for the Holidays: Keeping Them Fear Free℠

Puppies for the Holidays: Keeping Them Fear Free℠

Inevitably, January brings new patients that were given as gifts for the holidays. Help your clients get their new puppies off to a good start in the family and at the clinic with advice on positive training techniques.

Many veterinary practices incorporate digital images of new patients when creating patient records. Veterinary practices also use digital imaging to document specific patient conditions and, increasingly, to obtain images in the radiology suite. Many practices take “before and after” images of patients undergoing dental procedures to provide visual evidence of treatment to clients. Photographs can be used to help explain concepts or disease conditions to pet owners, which may lead to increased client compliance. Digital images can also be used to share patient information during consultations with other veterinary professionals and to create an image library for teaching purposes.

Digital Microscopy

Adding digital microscopy to a veterinary practice can greatly enhance recordkeeping and serve as a valuable tool for client education. This article provides an overview of the benefits of this technology and some useful resources for learning more.

Feline Physical Rehabilitation

Feline Physical Rehabilitation

Although rehabilitation is more commonly used for dogs, cats can also benefit from many of the same techniques—even swimming! Learn more about the whats, hows, and whys of feline physical rehabilitation.

The Case for Veterinary Midlevel Professionals

The Case for Veterinary Midlevel Professionals

This year, the 13th veterinary technician specialty—ophthalmology—was recognized by NAVTA. Is time for a new level of veterinary technician? This article looks at the parallels in the growth of the veterinary technician and nursing professions.

The field of shelter medicine has made enormous strides since the first shelter medicine residency was established at UC Davis in 2000. Get an inside look at the people who started the program and how they did it.

15 Years: A Brief History of Shelter Medicine

The field of shelter medicine has made enormous strides since the first shelter medicine residency was established at UC Davis in 2000. Get an inside look at the people who started the program and how they did it.

Behavioral Aspects of Caring for Elderly Cats

Behavioral Aspects of Caring for Elderly Cats

This article from the British journal Feline Focus reviews common behavioral changes in senior and geriatric cats and provides recommendations that clients can use in enriching and adapting the home environment for their older pets.

Emergencies cannot be predicted, but they can be anticipated. Learn how to create and stock a crash cart to prepare for the kinds of emergencies your clinic typically handles.

Crash Carts: Preparation and Maintenance

Emergencies cannot be predicted, but they can be anticipated. Learn how to create and stock a crash cart to prepare for the kinds of emergencies your clinic typically handles.

Preventing Motion Sickness in Dogs

In animals, motion sickness may be a behavior issue rather than a physical one. This article describes the potential causes of motion sickness in dogs and available therapeutic options.

Iron Toxicosis

Iron Toxicosis

Many common household items contain elemental iron, which can be toxic if consumed in great enough quantities. Learn how to calculate ingested amounts and the steps of decontamination and treatment in affected animals.

Helping Pets Enjoy Their Golden Years: The Technician’s Role

With improved wellness care, more pets are reaching their senior years. To help ensure good quality of life for aging pets, veterinary technicians should be knowledgeable about signs of emerging chronic illnesses and special considerations for nursing geriatric patients.

Zoonosis: What Is All the Fuss About?

Zoonosis: What Is All the Fuss About?

For those who live and work with animals, zoonoses are occupational hazards that most other professionals do not encounter. These hazards extend to pet owners, and humans can also transmit disease to their companion animals.

Pain Recognition and Management in Critical Care Patients

Pain Recognition and Management in Critical Care Patients

Pain has multiple negative effects that can delay or prevent healing, and veterinary technicians play a central role in pain management. Understanding pain, its consequences, and how it can be addressed helps veterinary technicians ensure that patients are comfortable during hospitalization and when they go home.

The Hairy Eyeball

The Hairy Eyeball: What’s Your Culprit?

Ocular problems are often described as “red” and “irritated” eyes. Myriad problems can present as “red eye.” Commonly missed causes of red eye are irritants that arise from the eye itself. Surprisingly, in practice, it seems that the most common causes are not external irritants or trauma, but rather abnormal hairs arising from the eyelids or periocular region.

Rehabilitation

Getting Started in Physical Rehabilitation

Physical rehabilitation is an exciting and challenging field in which veterinary technicians can develop new skills and grow in their career development. Over the past decade, awareness of animal physical rehabilitation has increased, and rehabilitation has become a rapidly growing service within veterinary specialty hospitals, referral centers, and primary care practices.

Taking the Bite out of Feline Mites

Taking the Bite out of Feline Mites

Besides fleas, lice, and ticks, a number of ectoparasites can affect cats. Veterinary technicians should be aware of the many ectoparasites that can cause skin disease in cats, be proficient in performing the necessary diagnostic tests, and understand the various available treatment options in order to educate cat owners.

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