CE Articles

Me-oww!
Managing Chronic Feline Pain

Alison Gottlieb BS, CVT, VTS (ECC), CARES Langhorne, Pennsylvania

Alison Gottlieb passed the National Veterinary Technician exam and also the Emergency Critical Care boards sponsored by the Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society (VECCS). Her career began at Cat Hospital At Towson (CHAT) where her passion for cats bloomed.

Alison was part of the health care team at the Veterinary Referral Center in Little Falls, New Jersey, serving Senior ICU Nurse. She was also responsible for training new technicians at the hospital, through lectures and hands-on experience.

Ali has served on various boards and professional committees, giving lectures and speeches on her work in the ER/ICU. She is also co-founder of Four Paws Consulting LLC, which focuses on technician education.

Combining a variety of treatment modalities optimizes pain management and patient comfort.

Fluid Calculations:
Keeping a Balance

Angela Thorp CVT, VTS (ECC, SAIM) 1st Pet Veterinary Centers, Chandler, Arizona

Angela has been in the veterinary field for over 25 years, obtaining her CVT and AAS in Veterinary Technology through DEVTP, and later obtaining her VTS in Emergency & Critical Care. She is a charter member of the Academy of Veterinary Internal Medicine Technicians (AIMVT), served as past president of the previous state technician association in Arizona and committee chair for the exam committee of AVECCT. Currently she serves as Executive Secretary of AVECCT and a Domain Chair of the AVECCT Nursing Standards Committee. Angela is also the NAVTA State Representative for Arizona. In 2001, she was awarded the Technician of the Year from the Arizona Veterinary Medical Association. She lectures, has been published, and currently serves the Team Director at 1st Pet Veterinary Centers.

IV fluid therapy is a skill veterinary technicians utilize daily.

Hypothermia

Dangers of Hypothermia: Avoiding the Cold

Brenda K. Feller CVT, RVT, VTS (Anesthesia and Analgesia) | Animal Specialty Hospital of Florida | Naples, Florida

Brenda graduated from Michigan State University, one of the first veterinary technician programs in the United States. She has worked in private practice, a university anesthesia department, and specialty practices during her career. She is not only a board member at large of the Academy of Veterinary Technicians in Anesthesia and Analgesia, but also a member of the academy’s examination, preapplication, and conference committees. She is married to Doug, a retired veterinarian, with three grown children and a growing number of grandchildren! Doug and Brenda share their house with a rescue Westie mix.

Brenda is a frequent speaker at major conferences and teaches online anesthesia classes. In her spare time, she likes to rollerblade and read nonfiction.

This article describes hypothermia dangers, causes, and risk factors; how to prevent or detect hypothermia; and how to treat it should it occur.

This article provides an overview of canine high-grade multicentric lymphoma and its classification, diagnosis, and treatment.

Canine Multicentric Lymphoma: An Overview

Kriste Sears-Sein RVT, VTS (Oncology) | University of California, Davis

Kriste has been working in the veterinary field in and around Sacramento, California, since 1997. After receiving her RVT in 1999, she began working in emergency and holistic medicine, which sparked her interest in the human–animal bond and quality-of-life focus in veterinary medicine. In 2008 she received her veterinary technician specialist certification in oncology, and since then has lectured around the United States on various topics related to cancer and compassionate care. She has been working as the Medical Oncology Supervisor at the University of California, Davis, since 2010.

This article provides an overview of canine high-grade multicentric lymphoma and its classification, diagnosis, and treatment.

With adequate preparation and understanding of the unique physiologic and anatomic differences involved, anesthetists can provide excellent care for pediatric patients. This article highlights these aspects of anesthesia in pediatric patients.

Anesthesia for Pediatric Patients

Trish Farry CVN, AVN, VTS (ECC, Anesthesia & Analgesia), TAA GCHEd | School of Veterinary Science at The University of Queensland, Australia

Trish Farry is an Australian certified nurse with specialist qualifications in emergency and critical care and anesthesia. She is an associate lecturer and clinical instructor in anesthesia within the School of Veterinary Science at The University of Queensland in Australia and co-coordinates the final year of BAppSci (Veterinary Technology) program. Her areas of teaching include emergency medicine, anesthesia, analgesia, and clinical practices for undergraduate veterinary and veterinary technology students.

Wendy Goodwin BVSc, PhD, FANZCVS (Veterinary Anaesthesia, Critical Care) | School of Veterinary Science at The University of Queensland, Australia

Wendy is a veterinarian with a PhD and specialist qualifications in veterinary anesthesia and critical care. She works at the School of Veterinary Science, University of Queensland, Australia, as a clinical anesthetist, lecturer, and researcher in the areas of anesthesia, analgesia, and critical care.

With adequate preparation and understanding of the unique physiologic and anatomic differences involved, anesthetists can provide excellent care for pediatric patients. This article highlights these aspects of anesthesia in pediatric patients.

Rabbit Dentistry

Rabbit Dentistry

Sarah Kolb RVT, VTS (Clinical Practice–Exotic Companion Animals) | Lloyd Veterinary Medical Center | Iowa State University

Sarah is a primary care/exotics registered veterinary technician and wildlife care clinic supervisor at Iowa State University Lloyd Veterinary Medical Center. She is pursuing her bachelor in applied sciences degree in veterinary technology from St. Petersburg College. She is a licensed wildlife rehabilitator, certified veterinary technician specialist (exotic companion animal), and national certified veterinary technician. Her interests include avian anatomy, physiology, behavior and training, anesthesia, and exotic companion animal enrichment and husbandry.

This article provides an overview of rabbit dentistry. Topics discussed include anatomy and physiology of the oral cavity; causes, clinical signs, and treatment of dental disease; diagnostic modalities; and prevention of dental disease.

Intervertebral Disc Herniation

Stephanie Gilliam RVT, BS, CCRP, VTS (Neurology) | University of Missouri Veterinary Health Center

Stephanie received her associate of applied science degree in veterinary technology from Jefferson College in Hillsboro, Missouri, in 2005. She began working at the University of Missouri Veterinary Health Center as the neurology/neurosurgery technician in 2007 and received her certification in canine rehabilitation from the University of Tennessee in 2008. She received her bachelor’s degree in veterinary technology from St. Petersburg College in 2011 and her Veterinary Technician Specialist credential in neurology in June 2013.

Stephanie is a deputy member with the proposed Academy of Physical Rehabilitation Veterinary Technicians as well as an adjunct clinical instructor with the Biomedical Sciences Online Program at the University of Missouri. She is pursuing her master’s degree in biomedical sciences with an emphasis in veterinary sciences.

Intervertebral disc herniation is the most common spinal disease in dogs. This article discusses the pathophysiology, signs, diagnosis, and treatment of this condition, as well as nursing care and rehabilitation.

Less than 6% of dogs and cats that experience cardiopulmonary arrest survive to discharge. The veterinary team needs to be well trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and be ready to deliver it. Key aspects include preparedness and prevention, basic and advanced life support, monitoring, and postarrest care.

Critical Components to Successful CPR: The RECOVER Guidelines, Preparedness, and Team

Kenichiro Yagi BS, RVT, VTS (ECC, SAIM) | Adobe Animal Hospital | Los Altos, California

Ken practices at Adobe Animal Hospital as an ICU and Blood Bank Manager. He is an active educator, lecturing internationally, providing practical instruction, and authoring texts, chapters, and articles on transfusion medicine, respiratory care, and critical care nursing. He serves on the boards of the Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society and the Academy of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Technicians, on the Veterinary Innovation Council, and as the NAVTA State Representative Chairperson. He is a graduate student in veterinary medicine and surgery through the University of Missouri. Ken invites all veterinary technicians to ask “Why?” to understand the “What” and “How” of our field and to constantly pursue new goals as veterinary professionals.

Less than 6% of dogs and cats that experience cardiopulmonary arrest survive to discharge. The veterinary team needs to be well trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and be ready to deliver it. Key aspects include preparedness and prevention, basic and advanced life support, monitoring, and postarrest care.

Doxorubicin is one of the most dangerous chemotherapeutics used in veterinary oncology. However, it is also one of the most common and efficacious treatments for several types of canine and feline cancer. This article provides an overview of doxorubicin’s uses and precautions to take when administering it.

Doxorubicin: An Overview

Emily Fullerton RVT, VTS (Oncology) | VCA Veterinary Referral Associates | Gaithersburg, Maryland

Emily obtained her associate’s degree from Vet Tech Institute in December 2008, leading her to her registered veterinary technician license in January 2009. She subsequently moved to Maryland, where she found her place in veterinary medicine: medical oncology. With her passion for helping animals and support from her coworkers, she achieved her Veterinary Technician Specialist certification in oncology in 2014. Emily has a love of  food and wine, her own fuzzy pets, and spending time with her family.

Doxorubicin is one of the most dangerous chemotherapeutics used in veterinary oncology. However, it is also one of the most common and efficacious treatments for several types of canine and feline cancer. This article provides an overview of doxorubicin’s uses and precautions to take when administering it.

Body Cavity Centesis: Techniques for the Pleural, Abdominal, and Pericardial Cavities

Body Cavity Centesis: Techniques for the Pleural, Abdominal, and Pericardial Cavities

H. Edward Durham, Jr CVT, RVT, LATG, VTS (Cardiology) | Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine | St. Christopher and Nevis, West Indies

Ed is currently a senior veterinary technician in the anesthesia section of the Ross School of Veterinary Medicine. Before moving to Ross University, he was the senior veterinary technician for the cardiology service at the University of Missouri Veterinary Health Center. He is a speaker at national and international conferences, has published several peer review articles in cardiology, and is the editor of the soon-to-be published Cardiology for Veterinary Technicians and Nurses. He is also a charter member of the Academy of Internal Medicine for Veterinary Technicians (AIMVT) and serves as the Director at Large–Cardiology on the AIMVT Executive Board.

Body cavity centesis is a valuable and effective treatment for removal of large effusions. Although veterinarians generally perform centesis, it is important for veterinary technicians to be knowledgeable about the techniques used to properly prepare, assist with, and monitor these patients.

Pediatric Emergencies

Louise O’Dwyer MBA, BSc (Hons), VTS (Anesthesia, ECC), Dip.AVN (Medical & Surgical), RVN | Vets Now United Kingdom

Louise has contributed to more than 35 books, journal articles, and book chapters, and lectures worldwide on all aspects of anesthesia, emergency and critical care, surgery, and infection control. After 15 years working at PetMedics in Manchester, England, as Head Nurse and then Clinical Director, in October 2015, she moved to Vets Now to take up the position of Clinical Support Manager.

Louise’s interests include all aspects of emergency care, particularly trauma, as well as anesthesia, surgical nursing, infection control, and wound management. In 2016, Louise was delighted to receive the prestigious Bruce Vivash Jones Veterinary Nurse Award, which recognizes outstanding contributions to the advancement of small animal veterinary nursing, as well as the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons Golden Jubilee Award for exceptional contribution to veterinary nursing. Louise is the President-Elect for the Academy of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Technicians.

Trish Farry CVN, VTS (ECC, Anesthesia/Analgesia), Cert.TAA, GCHEd | University of Queensland Queensland, Australia

Trish Farry is an Australian certified nurse with specialist qualifications in emergency/critical care and anesthesia/analgesia. She is an associate lecturer and clinical instructor in anesthesia at the School of Veterinary Science at The University of Queensland, where she also co-coordinates the final year of the Bachelor of Veterinary Technology program. Her areas of teaching include emergency medicine, anesthesia, analgesia, and clinical practices for undergraduate veterinary and veterinary technology students. She has been President of the Academy of Emergency and Critical Care Technicians as well as a board member of the Academy of Veterinary Technician Anesthetists and the International Veterinary Academy of Pain Management.

Neonatal and pediatric patients differ significantly from their adult counterparts. Veterinary nurses and technicians must understand these patients’ unique physiologic differences and how they affect diagnosis and treatment of emergencies.

Ferret Dentistry: No Weaseling About It!

Ferret Dentistry: No Weaseling About It!

Janyce Cooper LVT, VTS (Dentistry) | Pet Care Veterinary Hospital | Virginia Beach, Virginia

Janyce is a 2003 graduate of the veterinary technology program at Blue Ridge Community College. Her professional interest in animal dentistry began in early 2004, when she began working at Pet Care Veterinary Hospital in Virginia Beach. Her fascination with exotics mixed well with her passion to educate and improve the dental health of clients’ pets. Promoting quality dental care became her ambition, and as a result she has brought a higher standard of care to Pet Care Veterinary Hospital. In 2013, Janyce obtained her veterinary technician specialty in dentistry.

As with cats and dogs, periodontal disease in ferrets may go unnoticed by owners; therefore, many ferrets end up silently suffering from oral pain. Although it may be a challenging task, all ferrets need an annual oral examination, and ferret owners need education on oral care for their pet.

Keys to Successful High-Level Disinfection And Sterilization Processes

Heidi Reuss-Lamky LVT, VTS (Anesthesia & Analgesia, Surgery) | Oakland Veterinary Referral Services | Bloomfield Hills, Michigan

Heidi graduated from Michigan State University’s Veterinary Technology Program in 1984. After many years in private practice, she became affiliated with Oakland Veterinary Referral Services in 2006.

She became board-certified through the Academy of Veterinary Technicians in Anesthesia and Analgesia in 2003 and served on the credentials committee from 2005 to 2009. She served in the president’s role on the Executive Board of the Michigan Association of Veterinary Technicians from 2007 to 2009. She was a founding member of the Academy of Veterinary Surgical Technicians and currently sits on the executive board.

She is an accomplished author and lecturer and was presented with the 2013 NAVC Dr. Jack L. Mara Memorial Lecturer award.

Today’s veterinary technicians are uniquely placed to make a difference in the lives of animal patients, in part by ensuring that proper protocols and procedures are in place to help prevent perioperative infections. Learn about the different types of disinfection and sterilization processes and when each is appropriate.

Geriatric and pediatric patients have differences in physiology, pharmacology, and anatomy. Yet their anesthetic needs are often very similar to each other.

Opposite Ends of the Life Cycle, Similar Anesthetic Needs

Brenda K. Feller CVT, RVT, VTS (Anesthesia and Analgesia) | Animal Specialty Hospital of Florida | Naples, Florida

Brenda graduated from Michigan State University, one of the first veterinary technician programs in the United States. She has worked in private practice, a university anesthesia department, and specialty practices during her career. She is not only a board member at large of the Academy of Veterinary Technicians in Anesthesia and Analgesia, but also a member of the academy’s examination, preapplication, and conference committees. She is married to Doug, a retired veterinarian, with three grown children and a growing number of grandchildren! Doug and Brenda share their house with a rescue Westie mix.

Brenda is a frequent speaker at major conferences and teaches online anesthesia classes. In her spare time, she likes to rollerblade and read nonfiction.

Geriatric patients are generally assumed to be at higher risk than healthy young adults when undergoing anesthesia, but healthy pediatric patients should also be approached as challenges for the anesthetist. This article provides an overview of anesthesia considerations for both old and young patients.

Canine parvovirus is a longstanding nemesis of veterinary professionals. Learn why enteral feeding benefits patients with this common disease and how to measure, place, and use nasoesophageal and nasogastric tubes.

How and Why to Feed Canine Parvovirus Patients Right Away

Kenichiro Yagi BS, RVT, VTS (ECC, SAIM) | Adobe Animal Hospital | Los Altos, California

Ken practices at Adobe Animal Hospital as an ICU and Blood Bank Manager. He is an active educator, lecturing internationally, providing practical instruction, and authoring texts, chapters, and articles on transfusion medicine, respiratory care, and critical care nursing. He serves on the boards of the Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society and the Academy of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Technicians, on the Veterinary Innovation Council, and as the NAVTA State Representative Chairperson. He is a graduate student in veterinary medicine and surgery through the University of Missouri. Ken invites all veterinary technicians to ask “Why?” to understand the “What” and “How” of our field and to constantly pursue new goals as veterinary professionals.

Canine parvovirus is a longstanding nemesis of veterinary professionals. Learn why enteral feeding benefits patients with this common disease and how to measure, place, and use nasoesophageal and nasogastric tubes.

Preoperative Roles and Responsibilities of the Veterinary Surgical Nurse

Preoperative Roles and Responsibilities of the Veterinary Surgical Nurse

Danielle Browning LVMT, VTS (Surgery) | University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine

Danielle is a senior veterinary technician who currently works in the Department of Small Animal Clinical Services at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine, where she has been employed since September 2000. She is the ward nurse for soft tissue surgery. She currently serves on the American College of Veterinary Surgeons continuing education committee as the technician seminar/session chair and is a member-at-large of the Academy of Veterinary Surgical Technicians.

Karen Tobias DVM, MS, DACVS | University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine

Dr. Karen Tobias is a professor and board-certified surgeon at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine. She received her DVM from the University of Illinois and completed an internship at Purdue University and her surgery residency and master’s degree at Ohio State University. Dr. Tobias has published more than 100 scientific articles and book chapters. She is the author of the Manual of Small Animal Soft Tissue Surgery, co-editor of Veterinary Surgery: Small Animal, and co-author of Atlas of Ear Diseases of the Dog and Cat. Dr. Tobias resides in Knoxville, Tennessee, with one faithful dog and one annoying cat.

Successful surgical outcomes rely on more than the operative procedures themselves. Veterinary surgical nurses play critical roles in preparing the patient, the surgical suite, and the owner.

When Extraction Is Not an Option

When Extraction Is Not an Option

Jeanne R. Perrone CVT, VTS (Dentistry) | VT Dental Training, Plant City, Florida

Jeanne earned her associate in applied science degree in veterinary technology from Parkland College in Champaign, Illinois. From 2006 to 2015, she worked as a dentistry technician at Tampa Bay Veterinary Specialists in Largo, Florida, and The Pet Dentist of Tampa Bay in Wesley Chapel, Florida. She is currently self-employed as a consultant, trainer, and educator for technicians in veterinary dentistry. In addition, she is an adjunct instructor for the BAS VT program in dentistry at St. Petersburg College and an online instructor of dentistry courses at VetMedTeam.com.

A founding member and former president of the Academy of Veterinary Dental Technicians, Jeanne is also the editor of Small Animal Dental Procedures for Veterinary Technicians and Nurses.

Treatment of periodontal disease typically involves tooth extraction. However, in some circumstances, the client may wish to avoid extraction. Learn about some of the alternative periodontal therapies.

Briter, Header Choice 1

Urethral Obstruction in Male Cats

Courtney Beiter RVT, VTS (Anesthesia and Analgesia) | The Ohio State University Veterinary Medical Center

Courtney works at The Ohio State University Veterinary Medical Center in the Small Animal Emergency and Critical Care department. She graduated from Columbus State Community College in 2006 and obtained her VTS in Anesthesia and Analgesia in 2005. Courtney has several publications to her credit. She enjoys spending her free time with her husband and two daughters.

Urethral obstruction is a relatively common and potentially life-threatening emergency. Prompt, appropriate treatment and supportive care can give patients a good prognosis.

Purr-fect Feline Anesthesia

Purr-fect Feline Anesthesia

Heidi Reuss-Lamky LVT, VTS (Anesthesia & Analgesia, Surgery) | Oakland Veterinary Referral Services | Bloomfield Hills, Michigan

Heidi graduated from Michigan State University’s Veterinary Technology Program in 1984. After many years in private practice, she became affiliated with Oakland Veterinary Referral Services in 2006.

She became board-certified through the Academy of Veterinary Technicians in Anesthesia and Analgesia in 2003 and served on the credentials committee from 2005 to 2009. She served in the president’s role on the Executive Board of the Michigan Association of Veterinary Technicians from 2007 to 2009. She was a founding member of the Academy of Veterinary Surgical Technicians and currently sits on the executive board.

She is an accomplished author and lecturer and was presented with the 2013 NAVC Dr. Jack L. Mara Memorial Lecturer award.

Anesthetizing cats can present several challenges, from managing patient stress to administering anesthetics to monitoring during the procedure. Read this article for information that can help you improve the anesthesia experience for your feline patients.

Pain Management for Dental Patients

Pain Management for Dental Patients

Annie Mills LVT, VTS (Dentistry) | Atlanta Veterinary Dentistry and Oral Surgery | Orlando Veterinary Dentistry | Florida Veterinary Dentistry

Annie is a 1983 graduate of Macomb Community College in Macomb, Michigan. She currently serves on the board of the Academy of Veterinary Dental Technicians as President.

Annie has published several articles in professional journals and is coauthor of a textbook, Small Animal Dental Procedures for Veterinary Technicians and Nurses. She has also presented dentistry lectures and wet labs at national conferences and has worked with many teams to organize, create, and teach comprehensive dental programs.

Currently, Annie is working with Brett Beckman, DVM, FAVD, DAVDC, DAAPM, in a mobile dental referral practice. “Nothing gives me more satisfaction than to see the enthusiasm of other technicians engaged in learning something new and being able to implement it within their own hospitals. As technicians, we are driven to provide the best care for our patients. Learning a new skill to achieve that is a wonderful thing.”

Pain management is also a critical component of a comprehensive dental service. This article gives an overview of the physiology of pain, offers a discussion of a variety of analgesic agents, and provides information to help create an effective pain management protocol for dental patients.

The Ins and Outs of Managing Feline Chronic Kidney Disease

The Ins and Outs of Managing Feline Chronic Kidney Disease

Melanie Codi LVT, CVT, VTS (Nutrition) | Cornell University | Veterinary Specialists | Stamford, CT

Melanie obtained her veterinary technology degree from SUNY Ulster in 2008 and has been in specialty practices for the past 9 years, working in emergency/critical care and with boarded veterinary nutritionists. In 2011, she decided to obtain her veterinary technician specialist credential in nutrition; she felt that nutrition is often overlooked in general practice, critical care, and disease management. Melanie is an active member of the American Academy of Veterinary Nutrition and the committee of the Pet Nutrition Alliance. She lectures to owners as well as veterinary professionals on many topics.

Managing chronic kidney disease in cats can be a daunting task and is often frustrating for owners as well as practitioners and technicians.

Shock: An Overview

Brandy Tabor CVT, VTS (ECC) | Animal Emergency & Specialty Center | Parker, Colorado

Brandy Tabor, CVT, VTS (ECC), is a senior emergency/critical care technician at Animal Emergency & Specialty Center in Parker, Colorado. She is also chair of the Academy of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Technicians Credentials Committee, a board moderator with Veterinary Support Personnel Network, and an instructor of several courses at VetMedTeam.com. While pursuing her bachelor’s degree in equine science at Colorado State University, Ms. Tabor worked as an assistant in the critical care unit at the CSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital. There, the talented and knowledgeable nursing staff inspired her to become a veterinary technician specialist in emergency and critical care.

Shock is a sequela of trauma and diseases commonly seen in emergency practice, such as heart failure, inflammatory conditions (e.g., pancreatitis), or sepsis.

Scratching the Surface of Allergies in Dogs

Kim Horne AAS, CVT, VTS (Dermatology) | University of Minnesota

Kim is a member of the dermatology service at University of Minnesota Veterinary Medical Center. She is a charter member of the Academy of Dermatology Veterinary Technicians and its current president. Kim is also an active member of the Minnesota Association of Veterinary Technicians and NAVTA, actively participating in committees. She has spoken at many national meetings, has several publications to her credit, and is currently working on a dermatology text for veterinary technicians. Kim received her degree from University of Minnesota’s Technical College of Waseca. In her spare time, she enjoys hiking, kayaking, and spending time with her family.

Pruritus—a classic sign of allergic disease—is a common complaint described by dog owners.

Canine Diabetes Mellitus: It’s About the Sugar

Mandy Fults BS, LVT, CVPP, VTS (Clinical Practice — Canine/Feline) | Comanche Trail Veterinary Center | Liberty Hill, Texas

Mandy is a veterinary technician with more than 15 years of experience. She is currently employed with Comanche Trail Veterinary Center in Liberty Hill, Texas, as the clinical care coordinator. She earned her veterinary technology degree in 2001 and her bachelor of science degree in agriculture economics from Texas A&M University. Currently, she is pursuing a master’s degree in veterinary biomedical science, with small animal endocrinology as her primary interest.

Diabetes mellitus is an endocrine disorder characterized by insufficient production of insulin in the body (type 1, or insulin-dependent, diabetes) or a resistance to the hormone itself (type 2 diabetes).

MENU