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Ethics/Welfare

Spring 2019, Ethics/Welfare , Personal/Professional Development

Changing Animal Welfare on Native Reservations

Erin A. Spencer MEd, CVT, VTS (ECC)

Erin has a degree in veterinary technology (2001) and a master’s degree in education (2015). She earned her veterinary technician specialty in emergency and critical care in 2011. In 2009, Erin began volunteering with the Rural Area Veterinary Services program; in 2012, she accepted a full-time role. Erin spends 4 weeks each summer participating in field clinics on Native reservations in western states. Currently an assistant professor at the University of Massachusetts Veterinary Technology program, Erin is past president of the Massachusetts Veterinary Technician Association and the current president of National Association of Veterinary Technicians in America (NAVTA).

Rural Area Veterinary Services provides free veterinary care to underserved communities located in Native American reservations in the western U.S. It was life-changing for the author.

Animal abuse
Winter 2018, Ethics/Welfare

Animal Cruelty: Your Role in Identifying Abuse

Lisa M. Smith LVT, VTS (ECC) | Veterinary Specialty Center of Delaware

Lisa has over 20 years of experience in the field of Veterinary Medicine. She studied Animal Science at the University of Delaware, and became an LVT in 2008. She obtained her Veterinary Technician Specialist Certification in Emergency and Critical Care in 2014, and graduated with a Master’s of Science degree in Veterinary Forensic Sciences from the University of Florida in 2016. Lisa manages more than 60 technicians in a specialty and emergency hospital in Delaware, also working on the floor in the Emergency Service and ICU. She also provides CE lectures to local technicians on various topics, including RECOVER based CPR training. Lisa also serves on the Board of the Delaware Veterinary Medical Association as the technician representative. Author portrait courtesy of Marlene Waeltz Photographie.

Animal cruelty carries legal consequences that veterinary professionals need to understand in identifying abuse. Learn how to document and report cruelty.

The field of shelter medicine has made enormous strides since the first shelter medicine residency was established at UC Davis in 2000. Get an inside look at the people who started the program and how they did it.
Sep/Oct 2016, Ethics/Welfare

15 Years: A Brief History of Shelter Medicine

Michael Bannasch BS, RVT | UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine

Michael began his career in high school working as an animal care attendant, groomer, and veterinary assistant at a family-owned veterinary practice in the suburbs of Detroit, Michigan. He spent nearly a decade working at the Virginia–Maryland Veterinary Emergency Service and over a year at the National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. In 1998, Michael moved to California to accept a position in UC Davis’s Small Animal Intensive Care Unit. He joined Dr. Niels Pedersen’s lab 2 years later, and shortly after that he became program coordinator of the first shelter medicine veterinary training program in the world. After 15 years in that position, Michael joined the UC Davis Veterinary Center for Clinical Trials.

The field of shelter medicine has made enormous strides since the first shelter medicine residency was established at UC Davis in 2000. Get an inside look at the people who started the program and how they did it.

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