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Emergency Medicine/Critical Care

Jan/Feb 2017, Emergency Medicine/Critical Care

Sildenafil Exposure in a Dog

Brianna Wells CVT | ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center | Urbana, Illinois

Brianna discovered her passion for veterinary medicine when she worked as an assistant in a small animal clinic while attending college. She changed her career focus to veterinary technology and transferred to Parkland College, graduating from their veterinary technology program in May 2011. She earned her certification in July 2011. She has worked for the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center for a little over 4 years. Her special interests are toxicology and animal behavior.

In her spare time, Brianna likes to research genealogy, ride motorcycles with her family, and spend time with her dog, Parker.

Samantha Wright BS, MS | ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center | Urbana, Illinois

Samantha received her bachelor’s degree in animal science from the University of Illinois. She also has a master’s degree in leadership and executive coaching. She has worked for the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center for 6.5 years and has been a manager for the center for 4.5 years.

In her spare time, Samantha enjoys traveling with her husband Kevin and spending time with her 2 dogs and 4 cats.

Ingestion of high doses of sildenafil, which is used in both human and veterinary medicine, can affect heart rate and blood pressure. This case report describes the mechanism of action of sildenafil, along with recognition and management of a typical case of sildenafil exposure.

Cardiology , Emergency Medicine/Critical Care

Responding to a Cardiac Emergency: Pericardial Effusion in Canine Patients

Oriana D. Scislowicz BS, LVT | Cardiac Care for Pets, Richmond, Virginia

Oriana is Team Leader of CVCA – Cardiac Care for Pets, Richmond, Virginia. She currently serves on the editorial advisory board of Firstline, and has served on the executive board of the Virginia Association of Licensed Veterinary Technicians. Ms. Scislowicz writes for publications, such as NAVTA Journal, Firstline, VetTechLife, and Today’s Veterinary Practice. She received her BS in psychology from Virginia Commonwealth University and her AAS in veterinary technology from Blue Ridge Community College.

This article was originally published in the September/October 2015 “Today’s Technician” column of Today’s Veterinary Practice. Today’s Veterinary Practice is the NAVC’s official, peer-reviewed journal for veterinarians. You can find the full list of “Today’s Technician” articles on the Today’s Veterinary Practice website. Pericardial effusion is considered a cardiac emergency situation that is most commonly seen in …

Emergencies cannot be predicted, but they can be anticipated. Learn how to create and stock a crash cart to prepare for the kinds of emergencies your clinic typically handles.
July/Aug 2016, Emergency Medicine/Critical Care

Crash Carts: Preparation and Maintenance

Paula Plummer LVT, VTS (ECC, SAIM) | Texas A&M University

Paula has been at Texas A&M University since 2007, first working in the small animal intensive care unit and then moving to the feline internal medicine service in 2011. She graduated from Murray State College in Tishomingo, Oklahoma, and has been a registered veterinary technician since 2000. In 2011, she earned her veterinary technician specialty in emergency and critical care, and in 2014, she earned her second specialty in small animal internal medicine. Paula is also involved in teaching technicians in online programs and as a guest lecturer and lab instructor at local, regional, and national continuing education symposiums. When she is not working, Paula enjoys spending time with her husband and furry 4-legged family.

Emergencies cannot be predicted, but they can be anticipated. Learn how to create and stock a crash cart to prepare for the kinds of emergencies your clinic typically handles.

Emergency Medicine/Critical Care

Heatstroke in Dogs

Brandy Tabor CVT, VTS (ECC) | Animal Emergency & Specialty Center | Parker, Colorado

Brandy Tabor, CVT, VTS (ECC), is a senior emergency/critical care technician at Animal Emergency & Specialty Center in Parker, Colorado. She is also chair of the Academy of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Technicians Credentials Committee, a board moderator with Veterinary Support Personnel Network, and an instructor of several courses at VetMedTeam.com. While pursuing her bachelor’s degree in equine science at Colorado State University, Ms. Tabor worked as an assistant in the critical care unit at the CSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital. There, the talented and knowledgeable nursing staff inspired her to become a veterinary technician specialist in emergency and critical care.

This article was originally published in the September/October 2014 “Today’s Technician” column of Today’s Veterinary Practice. Today’s Veterinary Practice is the NAVC’s official, peer-reviewed journal for veterinarians. You can find the full list of “Today’s Technician” articles on the Today’s Veterinary Practice website. Heatstroke is a common problem in pets during the summer months, especially …

Pain Recognition and Management in Critical Care Patients
March/April 2016, Emergency Medicine/Critical Care , Pain Management

Pain Recognition and Management in Critical Care Patients

Brandy Tabor CVT, VTS (ECC) | Animal Emergency & Specialty Center | Parker, Colorado

Brandy Tabor, CVT, VTS (ECC), is a senior emergency/critical care technician at Animal Emergency & Specialty Center in Parker, Colorado. She is also chair of the Academy of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Technicians Credentials Committee, a board moderator with Veterinary Support Personnel Network, and an instructor of several courses at VetMedTeam.com. While pursuing her bachelor’s degree in equine science at Colorado State University, Ms. Tabor worked as an assistant in the critical care unit at the CSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital. There, the talented and knowledgeable nursing staff inspired her to become a veterinary technician specialist in emergency and critical care.

Pain has multiple negative effects that can delay or prevent healing, and veterinary technicians play a central role in pain management. Understanding pain, its consequences, and how it can be addressed helps veterinary technicians ensure that patients are comfortable during hospitalization and when they go home.

Jan/Feb 2016, Emergency Medicine/Critical Care

Shock: An Overview

Brandy Tabor CVT, VTS (ECC) | Animal Emergency & Specialty Center | Parker, Colorado

Brandy Tabor, CVT, VTS (ECC), is a senior emergency/critical care technician at Animal Emergency & Specialty Center in Parker, Colorado. She is also chair of the Academy of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Technicians Credentials Committee, a board moderator with Veterinary Support Personnel Network, and an instructor of several courses at VetMedTeam.com. While pursuing her bachelor’s degree in equine science at Colorado State University, Ms. Tabor worked as an assistant in the critical care unit at the CSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital. There, the talented and knowledgeable nursing staff inspired her to become a veterinary technician specialist in emergency and critical care.

Shock is a sequela of trauma and diseases commonly seen in emergency practice, such as heart failure, inflammatory conditions (e.g., pancreatitis), or sepsis.

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