News

Milo, Puppy Born with Upside Down Paws, Celebrates 6 Months Post-Surgery

Milo, Puppy Born with Upside Down Paws, Celebrates 6 Months Post-Surgery
Pictured (left to right): Milo’s family veterinarian, Dr. Summer Heatly (OSU ’09), Milo’s owner, Jennie Hays, and Dr. Erik Clary. Photo Courtesy: Derinda Blakeney, APR | OSU Center for Veterinary Health Sciences.
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

This is part 3 of Milo’s story, previously covered on Today’s Veterinary Practice. Read part 1 & 2.

Milo, now an 8-month-old Coonhound, and his owner, Jennie Hays of Luther, Oklahoma, joined Oklahoma State University’s Center for Veterinary Health Sciences team to celebrate the puppy’s progress six months post-surgery.

Born with congenital dislocation of both elbows, Milo had front paws pointing upside down when he first presented at 7 weeks of age to OSU’s Boren Veterinary Medical Hospital. With the deformity, he could neither stand nor walk but only muster an inefficient crawl. Dr. Erik Clary, a board-certified small animal surgeon, and his team performed corrective surgery to realign Milo’s elbows and derotate the paws to a normal orientation. Milo wore a front-body splint for 2 ½ weeks to protect the repair.

After the splint was removed, Milo began rehabilitative treatment under the direction of Dr. Cara Blake, a board-certified small animal surgeon and a certified canine rehabilitation therapist. Treatments continued with Milo’s owner and the family veterinarian taking the lead after Milo was discharged from the hospital on February 1. His regimen was quite intensive up until recent with daily muscle stretching exercises and short walks supplemented by two to three swim sessions per week.

Milo’s recovery has been most remarkable as he now runs, plays, and does most things that puppies his age should do. Dr. Clary comments, “Milo’s high level of function and general comfort are simply impressive and speak to the resiliency of this wonderful creature and also to the power of collaborative care. The VMH team, owner, and family veterinarian have all played critical roles in the provision of care. Furthermore, it is very gratifying to know that Milo’s story has inspired people across the nation and also served to educate on the present capabilities of specialty veterinary medicine that offer hope in situations once seemed hopeless.”

This article was reprinted from OSU News and Information with permission from Derinda Blakney, APR, OSU Center for Veterinary Health Sciences.

READ MORE

Read about LSU helping a turtle walk again.

Read about a rescued dog who was buried alive in Hawaii.

DMCA.com Protection Status
MENU